Lisk

List makes it easy to build and deploy decentralized applications in Jav...

home link https://lisk.io/

reference material Whitepaper.pdf

Community

Market
820.54 KRW
Exchanges that listed the coin
26
Symbol
LSK
Dapp
To be released
Project introduction

Lisk is a databus platform for public block chains that uses separate chains called sidechains that branch off the main body. The goal is to make your own DApp easily within the Lisk platform, where people are open source.

Executives and partners

Max Kordek

CEO

Oliver Beddows

CTO

Mariusz Serek

Backend Developer

Maciej Baj

Backend Developer

Vít Stanislav

Frontend Developer

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Medium

SDK 3.0.0 in QA, Lisk Deskt...

For more Lisk content, check out the new Lisk blog!Dear Community,The month of October saw our developer teams progress with the SDK and the Lisk Builders get with experimenting with our toolkit. There are also some exciting news from our UI team for hardware wallet fanatics. Here are the main takeaways:SDKLisk 3.0.0’s QA phase is in progress, with two alphanet testing cycles already completedAll of the remaining weeks of the year will be dedicated to alpha testing Lisk SDK 3.0.0.When we complete the full phase of quality assurance and find the network in a stable state, we will announce the public beta networkUILisk Desktop 1.23.0 has been released, includes new blockchain monitoring features. These include:Display list of latest blocks with custom filtering and sortingDisplay QR representation of address in walletEnable users to verify their address using hardware walletDisplay list of delegates sorted by their balanceDisplay list of accounts sorted by their balanceRevamp register and sign in pages to improve user experienceLisk BuildersFollowing Lisk.js, we’ve launched the new Lisk Builders Program which offers and opportunity for developers to receive financial support for Proof of Concept applications built using the Lisk SDK.Sidechain Solutions’ latest Proof of Concept and second recipient of the Lisk Builders Program, Chronicler; a blockchain to store, audit and/or verify various types of content. Edward Trosclair and the Sidechain Solutions team were in Berlin for Lisk.js and presented a full update on their latest projects. You can check the video out here.Moracle project provides a single, extensible API to interact with anything, unshackling blockchain applications and bridging centralized and decentralized systems. Jackson Roberts flew to Berlin to discuss the latest on the project. You can view the talk here.Jonathan Gros-Dubois finished the HTTP API for his DEX project. It allows browsing the decentralized order book for pending orders and supports advanced filtering and pagination.SDK & PlatformLisk 3.0.0’s QA phase is in progress, with two alphanet testing cycles already completedDuring the development of this major release, we have completed the “Security and Reliability” protocol roadmap phase and have moved on to testing on the temporary alphanet. During this process, we have identified certain issues (outlined below) and continue to release new alphas with the fixes. When we complete the full phase of quality assurance and find the network in a stable state, we will announce the public beta network, as we did when we published V1.QA testing for Block Synchronization Mechanism, Fast Chain Switching, and Fork Choice Rule has been also completed. You can read more about these features coming to 3.0.0 in the previous Development Update.During the QA phase this month, we have completed the following improvements and bug fixes:Added delegateMinHeightActive needs to be included in the calculation of prevote and precommit 4349Fixed Byzantine Fault Tolerance-related issues:Duplicate key violation during synchronization: 4532Block Finality: The block was not finalized as the earliest active round calculation for the first 5 rounds were incorrect, which was addressed by 4546Invalid transaction payload during RPC causes network isolation: When the peer sends a payload with invalid data format, all the nodes in the network were crashing leading to network isolation, this issue was addressed by 4501Block ordering issue: The block read from the database entity was returning the incorrect order leading to invalid block deletion, which lead to the synchronization mechanism to fail, which was addressed by 4518Fixed DPoS related issues:Finished Syncing & Snapshotting against Mainnet Database with new DPoS ModuleMem accounts state comparison after new DPoS Module implementation: 3686Improve Framework unit/functional/integration testsLazy push for transactions: Since transactions are not time-critical, we switch to a lazy push mechanism to broadcast the transaction. At regular intervals, the transactions selected by the transaction pool mechanism of a node will be announced to all connected peers by sending a list of transaction IDs. The peers can then request the full transactions explicitly from the Lisk node. 3344Peer information retention: After disconnecting from a peer, a peer’s reputation and productivity information will now be retained even after disconnect.Source group bucket calculation: For new peers, the IP address of the peer from which we receive the peer lists will now be included in the bucket calculation. Given a source_group IP address (a peer who provides a peer list), all IP addresses advertised by this source_group are hashed to at most 16 buckets.Seed peer discovery: After receiving peer lists from seed peers, we disconnect with them. If a node cannot successfully establish minimum outgoing connections within 30 seconds, it will fall back to querying seed peers for peer lists until it reaches the minimum number of outgoing connections number.Remove nonce broadcasting: The nonce property is removed from all of the RPC endpoint’s response and validation since it was unnecessary.All of the remaining weeks of the year will be dedicated to alpha testing Lisk SDK 3.0.0.UILisk Desktop 1.23.0 has been released, includes new blockchain monitoring featuresLast month we released Lisk Desktop version 1.23.0. As mentioned in the last Development Update, we have renamed the Lisk Hub project to Lisk Desktop and the application itself is now called Lisk. Download it here.Lisk Desktop 1.23.0 introduces new monitoring features to help advanced users get rich information about our blockchain, elaborated on below. You can find these features though the Monitor item in the top navigation bar. Monitoring features are temporarily only available for testnet and mainnet. So if you connect using your custom node, you won’t see Monitor item in the top bar. We’re working to make these features available for custom nodes too.Display list of latest blocks with custom filtering and sortingBy using this feature, you can browse through all the blocks and get detailed information about each one of them, including the list of transactions confirmed in this block. At the moment, the data on this page doesn’t automatically update, but we plan to add this feature in upcoming versions. You can filter the blocks based on the delegate who forged the block, date range and some other properties.This page enables you to sort the blocks based on their height. Click on the height title a few times and you’ll see the list of blocks change to sort from the latest to the first and vice versa. A small triangle in front of the title display the direction of sorting.Display list of latest transactions with custom filtering and sortingNext, you can browse through the list of all the transactions over the blockchain. This is similar to the list of transactions you have in your wallet page, but it’s not limited to your account and it extends filtering options. The list of transactions in this page, assuming not filtered, includes all transactions over the blockchain sorted by date. The filter panel introduced in this version is a lot more powerful than what we had before on the wallet page. Using this new panel you can filter transactions from any sender to any recipient. You can filter them by transaction type, date or for a given range or amount. It also works for any combination of the above filters.Additionally, you can sort this list based on date and amount. To achieve this, click on the column title.Display list of accounts sorted by their balanceWe have a similar feature on Lisk Explorer called top accounts. On Lisk Desktop, we simply call it accounts. It displays the list of all accounts over Lisk blockchain, sorted by their balance. So the account with the most tokens is displayed first. You can use this page to find out about the owners of top Lisks accounts.Display list of delegates sorted by their balanceYou might ask why do we have the list of delegates in two places? To answer that, we have to explain that advanced users use the list of delegates for two reasons: A. getting updated information about delegates activity and DPoS properties and B. voting for delegates and reviewing their vote list. Both actions are complex and require enough space to interact with. If you click on the list of delegates from the top navigation bar, you’ll find the old list of delegates. It will display fewer information for each delegate but gives you voting functionality. You can display the list of delegates you have or have not voted individually. If you navigate to the monitor tab, and then click on delegates, you’ll receive more information about each delegate. The forging time and status display the latest values for each delegate based on their activities on the network.To make this list more valuable, in upcoming versions we’ll add graphical statistics to this page so you can get an overall picture of network status in one glance.Last but not least, this list is sortable based on rank and productivity of the delegates.Display QR representation of address in walletAnother delicate touch on the wallet page is the QR code representation of the address. Now if you need to read an address from Lisk Desktop and use it in Lisk Mobile or any other application, you can simply scan it.Enable users to verify their address using hardware walletWe have received a request from our community members to enable users to verify their address in their hardware wallets. In other words, they asked for a button that when you clicked on it, it triggers your hardware wallet to display the address with which you have signed in. Vividly, this feature is only available if you have used a hardware wallet to sign in to Lisk Desktop. You can find this button in the wallet details panel, next to the QR code and copy buttons.Revamp register and sign in pages to improve user experienceAs explained in our previous development updates, we have run a series of user testing sessions and enhanced the UX of some pages. Lisk Desktop 1.23.0 revamps the register page, sign in and voting pages to bring more clarity to users. One of the issues new users faced using Lisk Hub (back then) was with setting up their passphrase. Since we used 12 separated inputs for the passphrase, most users couldn’t understand that these 12 words belong to a passphrase and they have to be saved together. We have merged these inputs to display a single entity instead of 12.We have also rearranged the options in the sign in page and got rid of the first landing page. Now you get all the options you need for signing using the passphrase or a hardware wallet, browsing as guest and registering a new account in one page. Additionally, you can sign in while enabling the discreet mode. In order to keep the application consistent, the aforementioned improvement of the passphrase input is applied to the register page too.To top that, we have improved the voting process on delegate page. Since there are around 2,000 delegates on the Lisk blockchain, it was difficult to find low ranked delegate scrolling down the page and then scrolling up to submit votes. We created a sticky action bar to stay visible when you scroll down the list of delegates. This will make it accessible at all times.Lisk BuildersFollowing Lisk.js, we’ve launched the new Lisk Builders Program which offers and opportunity for developers to receive financial support for Proof of Concept applications built using the Lisk SDK.Sidechain Solutions’ latest Proof of Concept and second recipient of the Lisk Builders Program, Chronicler; a blockchain to store, audit and/or verify various types of content. Edward Trosclair and the Sidechain Solutions team were in Berlin for Lisk.js and presented a full update on their latest projects. You can check the video out here.Moracle project provides a single, extensible API to interact with anything, unshackling blockchain applications and bridging centralized and decentralized systems. Jackson Roberts flew to Berlin to discuss the latest on the project. You can view the talk here.Jonathan Gros-Dubois finished the HTTP API for his DEX project. It allows browsing the decentralized order book for pending orders and supports advanced filtering and pagination.Lisk is on a mission to enable you to create decentralized, efficient, and transparent blockchain applications. Join us:Lisk DiscordSDK Page and NewsletterLisk ResearchTwitter

Lisk

19. 12. 05

SDK 3.0.0 Development Compl...

We are hosting a developer all-day event in Berlin on November 19th, 2019. Learn how to build blockchain applications, participate in coding challenges, educational blockchain talks, and an afterparty! Grab your free ticket here.Dear Community,The month of October saw our developer teams progress with the SDK and the Lisk Builders get with experimenting with our toolkit. There are also some exciting news from our UI team for hardware wallet fanatics. Here are the main takeaways:SDKAll of the main features planned for Lisk SDK 3.0.0 have completed development and are in the QA phaseLisk SDK 3.0.0 will also feature two new mechanisms from the BFT consensus protocol to improve block synchronization performanceDevelopment of the “mitigate transaction replay” feature is completedDevelopment on “remove redundant properties from transaction objects” is completedLisk BuildersCC001 announced bdonor, a platform that connects willing donors with projects in a secure and decentralized way.The team at Moosty created Lisk Roulette, an online roulette game built with the Lisk SDK.Sidechain Solutions have powered through some serious work this month, creating; Lisk Rebuilder, LiskAPI.io and Lisk Inviter, which was led by Lemii.Jon Gros-Dubois published a blog post with all the latest updates on his Lisk DEX project.ThePool created the LDice PoC and published a blog post explaining the concept.LiskMagazine continued the impressive output in October with nine articles posted.The LiskBike team have been making steady progress as we approach the lisk.js event on November 19th.UILisk Hub 1.22.0 has been released, includes Trezor One hardware wallet support, signed transactions, and Swiss Franc fiat currency conversion.We will be rename Lisk Hub to simply Lisk with version 1.23.0.SDK & PlatformAll of the main features planned for Lisk SDK 3.0.0 have completed development and are in the QA phaseThe main features include the following Lisk Improvement Proposals:Introduce robust peer selection and banning mechanism (LIP-0004)Mitigate transaction replay on different chains (LIP-0009)Remove redundant properties from transaction objects (LIP-0012)Introduce BFT consensus protocol (LIP-0014)Our QA process has started, and our focus has now switched to improving tests, identifying implementation details deviated from the LIPs, and doing some small refactoring.Development of the “mitigate transaction replay” feature is completedLIP-0009 was completed and included in SDK 3.0.0. This LIP proposes to mitigate transaction replay on different chains by introducing a network identifier as a constitutive component of the signature of a transaction.Development on “remove redundant properties from transaction objects” is completedLIP-0012 has been completed and included in SDK 3.0.0 as well. The current protocol allows for, and partially enforces, the usage of property-value pairs in transaction objects that are neither required nor used. These property-value pairs are contained in the JSON objects used to transmit transactions and in the input messages for the transaction signature and the transaction ID generation. This increases the size of transactions and the complexity of the protocol unnecessarily. Therefore, this LIP proposes to remove these redundant properties from transaction objects.Lisk SDK 3.0.0 will also feature two new mechanisms from the BFT consensus protocol to improve block synchronization performanceThe two synchronization mechanisms mentioned in LIP-0014 have been implemented: Block Synchronization Mechanism and Fast Chain Switching.The first is triggered when a block is received and the difference in block slots between itself and the finalized block slot of the system is bigger than the number of delegates multiplied by 3 (303). The process of syncing is easy: the best peer out of the list of connected peers is computed according to the peer selection algorithm mentioned in LIP-0014 and blocks are requested to that peer and applied in chunks. The second, Fast Chain Switching mechanism is triggered when the difference in height between block received from the network and the latest block that node has is smaller than the number of delegates multiplied by two (202). Once triggered, blocks are requested and validated. If all of them are valid, the blocks are applied. This will allow nodes which are slightly behind on height or in a fork state, to catch up with the network faster than the block synchronization mechanism.Lisk BuildersccCC001 announced bdonor, a platform that connects willing donors with projects in a secure and decentralized way.The team at Moosty created Lisk Roulette, an online roulette game built with the Lisk SDK. You can read more here.Sidechain Solutions have powered through some serious work this month, creating; Lisk Rebuilder, LiskAPI.io and Lisk Inviter, which was led by Lemii.Jon Gros-Dubois published a blog post with all the latest updates on his Lisk DEX project.ThePool created the LDice PoC and published a blog post explaining the concept.LiskMagazine continued the impressive output in October with nine articles posted. You can read all the most recent posts here!The LiskBike team have been making steady progress as we approach the lisk.js event on November 19th. If you haven’t signed up for their workshop, you can do so here.PS: Always use third party tools with caution.User InterfacesLisk HubLisk Hub 1.22.0 has been released, includes Trezor One hardware wallet supportWe are happy to announce that our desktop application is able to support another member of the Trezor family, Trezor One. This is the fourth hardware wallet supported by Lisk Hub, after Ledger Nano S, Ledger Nano, X and Trezor Model T. You can read more about this implementation in our previous Development Update.After the latest refactor made in our hardware wallet module, it was pretty straightforward to add support for Trezor One. The only specific of this hardware wallet is how the device is unlocked by PIN. All the previously supported models handle entering PIN by their own buttons or touch screen and don’t require any support in the desktop app for unlocking the device. If the device is locked, it doesn’t even show up on Hub. Trezor One, however, uses a blind metrix (for more info see official Trezor docs here) for entering the PIN.Same as the other hardware wallets you can ‘Sign In’ with your Trezor One, selecting the option ‘Sign In’ with Hardware Wallet from the ‘Sign In’ page.Then you will see the the new page with the matrix screen to introduce your Trezor One pin.After you unlock your Trezor One device, you will see the available accounts in the next screen.After you select the account that you want to sign in to, you will be able to access and manage your tokens via Hub. In the confirmation page, you will always need to use your Trezor One device to confirm or reject that transaction.Lisk Hub 1.22.0 allows you to verify the authenticity of your account by signed messagesThe new version of Lisk Hub enable you to sign a random message. One of the benefits of this feature is to prove the ownership of your account. This feature was available in Lisk Hub but there was no screen to enable users to validate signed messages and users had to do so using our old wallet, Lisk Nano, or other tools developed and maintained by other community members. With this release, we have added a screen dedicated to verifying messages which are signed as mentioned above. You can access this screen through a launch protocol: `Lisk://sign-message`. Simply click on this link and, if Lisk Hub is installed on your computer, it’ll run the app, and open the sign message page. You can input any string/message and the output will be similar to the following screen:Similarly for verifying a signed message, you can click on `Lisk://verify-message `. There are two options: you can either enter the entire message generated by Lisk Hub in a single input:Or you can enter the values individually:Choose one of the methods, fill in your information accordingly and press continue — Lisk Hub will determine if the message was signed by the owner of the account whose public key is included in this signed message or not. If successful, your screen should display this:PS: With the next release, we are dropping ‘Hub’ in the name. Our desktop app will simply be called Lisk.Lisk Hub 1.22.0 introduces the anonymous Matomo analytics call-to-action banner to guide product developmentEvery piece of software needs to receive feedback from real users to help understand their experience and build on it. This statement is valid for all the project and Lisk Hub is not an exception. Many teams use Google Analytics to gather information, also a feature-rich product for collecting statistics In order to guarantee user privacy however, we have chosen to implement Matomo which is run on our servers and therefore promises 100% data ownership and provides you with a secure way to give us information about your experience. Furthermore, we’re collecting only potential JavaScript erros and usage statistics anonymously, while more sensitive information such as IP, passphrase, location or any other sensitive information are not involved in this process. Since this option was less visible in the settings page, we decided to ask your to activate Matomo using a banner under the main header.If you use Lisk Hub, we would really appreciate if you activate this feature to help us constantly improve your experience of our wallets in the future.We have introduced visual testing in order to eliminate visual defects in HubIn October, we have expanded our testing efforts with the help of visual testing. The idea is to capture DOM snapshots and assets for the specific screens during our testing process and send them to a visual testing provider to render screenshots. Screenshots are then compared with the latest approved ones. In case there are any differences in pixel-by-pixel comparison, we get a warning meaning layout or styles were changed. There are a variety of tools to fulfill visual testing and we are using Percy. Bellow you can see a screenshot which demonstrates Percy capturing an unintended change in our generic style rules which affected basic HTML elements:We should either approve changes or raise our attention and identify the code that caused unintended effects. This approach compliments our functional testing and helps to eliminate visual defects.Lisk Hub 1.22.0 also supports Swiss Franc fiat currency conversionWe have added Swiss Franc (CHF) to the list of supported fiat currencies on Lisk Hub. before this, we were only supporting Euro and USD. We added CHF because Lisk project is developed by a Switzerland-based Foundation and we have many users from that region. You can choose the Swiss Franc as your default currency in Setting pages. After that you will be able to choose your desired fiat currency converter in the transaction page.Lisk Development TeamLisk is on a mission to enable you to create decentralized, efficient, and transparent blockchain applications. Join us:Lisk DiscordSDK Page and NewsletterLisk ResearchTwitterSDK 3.0.0 Development Complete and New Proof-of-Concepts was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 11. 07

Everything You Need to Know...

In the coming months, we will be gradually decreasing our reliance on Medium and focusing on our own blog. Get all the news about Lisk there!Lisk is all about blockchain accessibility. We’re always working out new ways to make our assets as intuitive to use and as dynamic to adapt as possible. With this in mind, we are happy to announce the result of a collaboration between Lisk and design agency Netguru — a new website for the Lisk brand. The main purpose of the new, refreshed visual style and website is to help Lisk be more responsive to a growing blockchain application platform. In this blog, we will point out the main changes that you can look forward to.New Website Allows Us to Support a Rapidly Growing Lisk EcosystemWith new proof-of concept blockchain applications being built weekly, our website needs to be ready to quickly onboard new modules and generate more pages. A migration to a new content management system (CMS), Drupal, allows us to quickly align our website to showcase new projects being built on Lisk, spotlight community member’s initiatives like Lisk Centers around the globe, or grow our upcoming Developer Relations platform.Most-Searched Lisk Academy Pieces Will Be Repurposed Into Series on the Built-in BlogThe new website will be built out to accommodate our growing developer community and resources. We have decided that, in line with this new strategy, we will discontinue the static Lisk Academy pages and instead use its highest performing articles to grow out our new built-in blog. This will decrease our reliance on an increasingly restrictive Medium which has seen an exit of major developer publications like Hacker Noon. This approach also allows us to use time and manpower resources spent on maintaining Lisk Academy on more developer-focused parts of the new website.Website’s New Identity is More Appealing to Developers and Mainstream UsersIf you use our cryptocurrency wallets, or follow our GitHub, you would have noticed elements of the new visual style, now fully featured on our website, being introduced in the last few months. The animations, color codes and everything else that makes up our new platform have been chosen to appeal to developers increasingly interacting with our recently released SDK as well as non-technical mainstream users. They have been decided based on internal developer and user surveys, using the design experience of the Lisk Design Team and the award-winning Netguru agency.We hope you enjoy the new website, if you have any feedback don’t hesitate to drop by our Discord to share your opinion.The Lisk TeamLisk is on a mission to enable you to create decentralized, efficient, and transparent blockchain applications. Join us:TwitterDiscordLisk ResearchJoin us at lisk.js 2019

Lisk

19. 11. 01

Financial Update — Septembe...

Financial Update — September 2019Our regular Financial Updates are published on the second Thursday of the following month. They will help you gain insight into the Foundation’s current financial health with a breakdown of total assets held, expenses and portfolio changes had during the previous month. The Lisk Foundation is registered in Zug, Switzerland — because of this, all financial reports are created in Swiss Francs (CHF). You can find the most up-to-date conversions here.Total Assets Held by the Lisk FoundationIn this section, you can check up on all fiat currency and cryptocurrency assets currently in possession of the Foundation. We will also use this part of the update to let you know about any major changes in our portfolio.Crypto Asset Liquidation in SeptemberThe Lisk Foundation is liquidating its assets in an on-going strategy to provide enough liquidity for the projects expenses. Currently, we are following the rule to have enough fiat to cover 12 months of expenses. In the month of September, we have liquidated the following cryptocurrencies into fiat currency through Bitcoin Suisse:4.000,00 BCHWe liquidated them into:1.159.162,17 CHFTotal Expenditures for the Month of SeptemberIn the expenditures section of the Financial Update, you can see how much the Foundation has spent on various aspects of Lisk’s growth. For your convenience, we have divided this section into four areas:Development — by far the biggest area of expenditure by the Lisk Foundation, this encompasses everything spent on the research, development, and design of Lisk Core, SDK, Hub, Mobile and Explorer.Marketing — this key area of growth for Lisk includes not only traditional marketing like public relations, or performance, but extends to everything spent on business development, event management, and creative design. It also includes our new Developer Relations department.Bounties & Sponsorships — the stronger the Lisk community, the stronger our blockchain is going to be. Under this area of expenditure we outline all money spent on bug bounties, supporting proof-of-concept blockchain applications built with the Lisk SDK, or joint efforts with community members like the Lisk Center in Utrecht.Operations — here, we mention all expenses needed in the day-to-day running of the Lisk Foundation, such as salaries, office costs, or administrative contractors dealing with accounting or legal compliance.Disclaimer: The information contained in the monthly Financial Updates are primarily of informational value. Minor differences from their actual state may occur due to different moments of booking of certain inflows and expenses, as well as their possible subsequent corrections. Thus, this information cannot serve as an accurate reference point to the exact state of finances of the Lisk Foundation and the costs associated with developing the Lisk Project.Lisk is on a mission to enable you to create decentralized, efficient, and transparent blockchain applications. Join us:Lisk DiscordSDK Page and NewsletterLisk ResearchTwitterFinancial Update — September 2019 was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 10. 10

Lisk SDK 2.3.6, Hub 1.22.0'...

Lisk SDK 2.3.6, Hub’s Upcoming Trezor One Support & Lisk Builders’ Community Security BountyWe are hosting a developer all-day event in Berlin on November 19th, 2019. Includes SDK workshops, coding challenges, educational blockchain talks, and networking sessions. RSVP here.Dear Community,The month of September saw our developer teams progress with the SDK and the Lisk Builders get with experimenting with our toolkit. There are also some exciting news from our UI team for hardware wallet fanatics. Here are the main takeaways:SDKWe released Lisk SDK 2.3.6 along with four patches (from 2.3.3 to 2.3.6).The above releases are focused on resolving the instability on the Mainnet, which did not happen on the Testnet or the internal testings.We also update you the Byzantine Fault Tolerance (BFT) consensus and full implementation of the P2P layer the team is working on for the next versions of Lisk SDK.UILisk Hub 1.21.0 was released, includes discreet mode and German language localization.Lisk Hub 1.22.0 will add support for the Trezor One hardware wallet, the fourth device after already supporting Ledger Nano S, Ledger Nano, X, Trezor Model T.LiskBuildersSidechainSolutions’ Lemii launched Community Security Bounty and is developing the Lisk Dynamic Forging Controller (Lisk DFC)Delegate ThePool is working on a proof of concept application using the Alpha SDK.Community member GYM has submitted several issues to the Lisk bug bounty program.SDKLisk SDK 2.3.6 was released to resolve instability on Mainnet caused by older versions of nodesWe released Lisk SDK 2.3.6 along with four patches (2.3.3 to 2.3.6). The development team responsible for the implementation of the new P2P layer for Lisk focused on resolving several issues which happened when the new `Partial Network` nodes interacted with older `Full Mesh Network` ones. When releasing to Mainnet, we found that broadhash consensus among nodes was lower than usual. The main reason for this was due to low block propagation caused by the peer selection function unevenly sending blocks between `Inbound` and `Outbound` peers (#4271). This was resolved by ensuring that half of a node’s peers are selected from the inbound list and half from the outbound list. We further stabilized broadhash consensus by adding a periodic “update status” job on outbound peer connections to keep the node up-to-date (#4261). Another issue was found in which peer buckets were growing over the specified limits. The fix to this issue should allow for more efficient use of resources (#4279). For more information on the topic of new nodes, check out our previous LiskDevUpdate.The “lisk-p2p” Library is Getting Ready to Add More Features in Lisk SDK 3.0.0Finally, the team worked on improving both unit (#4227) and integration (#4199) test coverage for the `lisk-p2p` library in Lisk Elements, as well as refactoring code to resolve a cyclomatic complexity issue (#3859). With better test coverage, `lisk-p2p` library development can speed up by being able to identify issues earlier and with ease.Upcoming BFT Consensus — Rewriting the New DPoS Module Has Been CompletedThis month we hit a major milestone towards finishing the development of Lisk SDK 3.0.0, which is scheduled to feature Lisk’s new BFT consensus. The development of the DPoS module has been completed (#3680) and we already replaced it with the old Rounds module. All code and database components related to the old Rounds module have been removed (#3685). And of course, we added full unit and integration test coverage for the DPoS module (#4249). DPoS module is currently being tested against Testnet and Mainnet (#3686). We found that some exceptions on our Testnet are not compatible with our new implementation and are breaking syncing (#4194). However, this problem doesn’t exist on Mainnet. You can read more about the upcoming BFT consensus in Nazar’s post on Hacker Noon.Alongside that, we completed some of the other essential and shared components of Fast Chain Switching and Block Synchronization mechanisms like restoring blocks from temporary storage (#3775).UILisk Hub 1.21.0 was released, includes discreet mode and German language localizationLast month, we released the final version of Lisk Hub 1.21.0 with several handy features. You can find out more about them in our previous dev update.Lisk Hub 1.22.0 will add support for the Trezor One hardware walletWe keep on improving support for hardware wallets in Lisk Hub, having already included Ledger Nano S, Ledger Nano, X, Trezor Model T. During the development of this release, we have spent a considerable amount of time on refactoring the whole hardware wallets module to make it more modular and abstract away API differences of individual vendors. We did this to make adding support for a new hardware wallet as easy as possible and involves only writing a module that converts the vendor-specific API into a common API for all hardware wallets.WIth this in place, it was pretty straightforward to add support for Trezor One. The only specific of this hardware wallet is how the device is unlocked by PIN. All the previously supported models handle entering PIN by their own buttons or touch screen and don’t require any support in the desktop app for unlocking the device. If the device is locked, it doesn’t even show up on the desktop app. Trezor One, however, uses a blind metrix (for more info see official Trezor docs) for entering the PIN. To solve this, we have implemented the PIN page (see screenshot below). This update is aimed for Lisk Hub 1.22.0.Lisk BuildersOver the past few months, Lemii has continued his impressive output, launching a Community Security Bounty and building the Lisk Dynamic Forging Controller (Lisk DFC) with guidance and support from StellarDynamic. Lisk DFC has been developed to provide controller and monitoring services to help manage forger nodes. You can check out all the details on the Sidechain Solutions GitHub and keep up to date with the latest bounty initiatives on Discord.Delegate ThePool are working on a proof of concept application using the Alpha SDK. More information will be revealed shortly but in the meantime, you can give them a follow on Twitter to track their progress or reach out directly if you’re interested in contributing.Community member GYM has submitted several issues to the Lisk bug bounty program.Always use third party tools with caution.Lisk Development TeamLisk is on a mission to enable you to create decentralized, efficient, and transparent blockchain applications. Join us:Lisk DiscordSDK Page and NewsletterLisk ResearchTwitterLisk SDK 2.3.6, Hub 1.22.0's Upcoming Trezor One Support & Lisk Builders’ Community Security Bounty was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 10. 03

Our Path to Changing the Vo...

Introduction to Lisk’s ResearchLast February, we published a proposal to change the voting system on Lisk’s Research Forum following the Lisk Improvement Proposals (LIPs) process. This thread has received a lot of attention and discussions. Voting and elections are a hotly debated subject in general — Lisk is no exception. Not every LIP requires a blogpost, but we feel it’s important to expand on this topic to the wider community. We’d like to thank every member of the community who has dropped by the forum to share their thoughts on the future of Lisk’s consensus algorithm.We are happy to announce that we have published three new LIPs to achieve the “Network Consensus” roadmap milestone, at the same time incorporating community feedback.This blog post is broken down into three main sections. In the first, we describe the properties we feel are most important for a voting system. Then, we point out areas of improvements and why the current system needs an update in the first place. In the second section, we give an overview of the proposal made last February and some proposed solutions by community members. We also explain why we have edited our roadmap to prioritize the improvement of our DPoS. In the third, we present the content of the three new LIPs and explain why we believe them to be the best solution for Lisk. Each one of the new LIPs has a dedicated thread on the research forum where it is published and discussed.Terminology used in this blog postA delegate: any account which has expressed interest in being a block forging account. This is done by issuing a “register delegate” transaction via Lisk Hub or Lisk Commander. Any account can register as a delegate. At this time, there are 1804 registered delegates.Active delegate (for a given round): a delegate selected to forge a block and receive block rewards in this round.Vote weight: the amount of support given by a vote. Currently, any vote you cast has weight equal to your account balance. With the new proposal, you can choose the vote weight of each vote you cast.Delegate weight: the weight of the delegate in the selection mechanism. A delegate with high weight is more likely to forge a block than a delegate with low weight. Currently, the delegate weight is calculated as the sum of all the votes they have received.Standby delegate: a delegate not active in a given round. Currently, those delegates do not receive the right to forge blocks. In the new DPoS system, they would be selected to forge proportionally to their delegate weight.Rationale for Choosing a Voting SystemBefore getting into any specifics, we’d like to define the factors relevant to the choice of our DPoS system. In other words, how do we define the process and set of rules to select the forging delegates in Lisk? As mentioned in the “Change to one vote per account” proposal, there is no such thing as the perfect voting system, but depending on the specific blockchain’s use cases and specifications, different properties can be prioritized. For Lisk, after all the feedback expressed by the community (gathered in the mentioned proposal and through other channels) and an internal research considering this feedback, we came out with five properties for the voting system:Decentralization: The voting system should not incentivize voting groups or coalitions. They may be created by community engagement or social reasons, but the voting system should not itself encourage them.Open & Fair: Our DPoS blockchain should encourage motivated individuals to run a forging node. Fairness is difficult to define, but in general for PoS systems, it can be approached when forging delegates receive block rewards proportionally to their staked tokens.Security: We should incentivize stakeholders to elect delegates who maintain a secure and effective network. Our DPoS system should also enforce some sort of accountability for delegates. This is, if a delegate is not behaving by the rules, this behaviour can be spotted and the delegate punished.Efficiency: The voting system should allow to efficiently compute the set of forging delegates. Also, voting transactions should be kept as small and efficient as possible. This way the network will be able to process blocks faster and it will scale easily with the increasing number of voters.Flexibility: Voters should have the flexibility to give different vote weights to their preferred delegates if they choose so.Reasons to improve our DPoS mechanismCurrently in Lisk, every account holder can vote for up to 101 delegates and the weight of each vote is the balance of its account. This voting system faces three key challenges:Incentive to form coalitions: Your current vote weight is independent of your number of votes. This creates a high incentive for delegates to form coalitions by voting for each other. The Lisk blockchain aims to be a trustless system, relying on decentralization for its security. To put it simply, the voting system should give no economic incentive for delegates to form groups and instead foster decentralization wherever possible.High entry barrier: There is currently a very high barrier for anybody wanting to become an active delegate. For example, a delegate with the support of roughly 5% of the total amount of LSK might not be able to become an active delegate. This opposes the core principle of PoS claiming that your probability of forging should be roughly proportional to your account balance.Complex delegate weight updates: In the current system, all transactions mean a change of the account balance which in turns means a change of the affected delegate weights. This adds a lot of strain on the network and affects its efficiency. This is especially the case when a block contains a balance transaction where the sender and the recipient of the transaction are accounts voting 101 delegates. It can be the case that this transaction requires to update more than 200 values (consider that these accounts are voting different delegates) in the nodes database.Previous InputTo dive into potential solutions to the challenges listed above, let’s detail three of the propositions made in the research forum.One Vote per AccountAs the starting point of the discussion around the `Change voting system` roadmap objective, the Research Team proposed the “Change to one vote per account” LIP. With this proposal, every account would have at most one vote with a weight given by its balance. This proposal addressed the three main challenges of the current system mentioned above: Allowing accounts to only cast one vote would remove any mathematical advantage of forming coalitions. At the same time, it would lower the barrier of entry, so that gathering support of 1% of the total LSK would be sufficient to become an active delegate. Additionally, this system makes the computation of delegate ranks very efficient.However, since each account can only cast a unique vote, it does not give enough flexibility for the users to vote according to their preferences. This LIP has gathered a lot of attention and we recommend you to read the full debate.Proportional Reelection Each RoundAn option suggested on the research forum by cc001 would be to re-select the forging delegates randomly each round, proportionally to their total vote weight. This system doesn’t have a fixed set of active delegates and forging delegates are re-selected every round. Choosing the delegates this way is interesting. In fact, we are taking a similar direction in order to select the two forging standby delegates (see the New Selection Mechanism section below).Selecting delegates this way does address the three challenges mentioned above. However, it also introduces most of the difficulties found in proof of stake systems, such as a very unsteady set of forging delegates or having access to a good source of randomness. The research forum link mentioned above includes the debate on this topic.Change the Maximum Number of VotesAnother key proposal suggests keeping the current voting system, but modifying the maximum number of votes. Forum member “Consensus” suggested lowering this number to 20. This would limit the ability to share votes in a coalition and would improve decentralization of the network. On the other hand, “cc001” would prefer to increase it to 131. This would give accounts the possibility to vote for all 101 active delegates to receive rewards and still have 20 votes left to support standby delegates.Overall, changing the number of delegates could be a step in the right direction for Lisk, but it doesn’t directly solve the challenges stated above. Modifying the number of votes can change the extent to which delegates exchange votes, or can mitigate the high entry barrier problem. But it doesn’t reduce the complexity nor does it increase the accountability of the current system. We feel that we need a more convincing change.After much discussions on the research forum and additional research from our team. We felt that the above solutions do not fully address the current challenges, or, in some cases, create new ones. The discussions on the research forum have been very helpful and the new DPoS presented below owes a lot to them. We would like to thank cc001, thepool, st3v3n_delegate, carbonara, carolina_delegate, 5an1ty, Matthew_Alexander, Santerr, hirish, korben3, Simon Warta, JesusTheHun, lisk.central.america for their contributions in the forum discussions.Update in the Development RoadmapConsidering the mentioned limitations of the current voting system and the extensive feedback from the community on it, we have decided to update the timeline of the Protocol Roadmap presented at the end of 2018. The “Network Consensus” milestone will now be implemented before “Network Longevity”. This implies that the changes in the voting system and related aspects in the consensus algorithm will be implemented and released next after the “Network Economy” milestone.The main motivation for this decision is to bring these improvements to the DPoS system and network consensus sooner rather than later. We acknowledge that these improvements are more important than, for example, implementing a new ID system. Additionally, the “Network Longevity” phase includes the “Introduce decentralized re-genesis” objective. The nature of this objective makes it more effective once the protocol changes from the DPoS milestone are implemented. You can read the full rationale here.Introducing three new DPoS LIPsThe three new LIPs define a whole new mechanism for choosing the forging delegates in Lisk. If chosen for implementation, they will introduce a new vote transaction, a locking mechanism for voted tokens, a new way to compute the delegate weight and a new method to select forging delegate from those weights. We believe these changes address the current challenges in our consensus algorithm. The three LIPs would allow users to support their favorite delegates with their votes having significant weight, as well as allow motivated individuals to run a forging node and receive rewards for their efforts.We also introduce consequences for delegates violating the consensus rules and for their voters. This makes voting an important decision and we recommend that you research available information on the delegates you wish to vote for.Presenting the New Lisk DPoSNew Voting MechanismThe LIP Introduce vote locking periods and new vote weight definition proposes a change of the voting system. We suggest to move closer to a proof of stake system by having voters lock their tokens when casting a vote. This means that voting is now more consequential (your tokens are locked) but also more flexible (you can choose how much you lock for each vote).Accounts will be able to vote for up to ten delegates, but a given LSK token can only be used in a single vote. This system brings new benefits by, for example, taking away the incentive for delegates to “trade” votes. In other words, delegates will have no incentive to form alliances since they are encouraged to campaign independently for each vote.This also means that any delegate gathering support by a fraction of 1/101 of the total stake is guaranteed to be an active delegate. We feel that this is an important feature of proof of stake systems and we would like to see it appear in Lisk.Locked TokensEven though they are “locked”, the tokens used for voting are still your own. The delegate does not gain any access to them. In no case should you send tokens to a delegate while voting.Unvoting will be done with the same transaction, but with a negative amount. After unvoting, you will have to wait for a given amount of time before to be able to use the tokens for something else. The waiting period for voters will be 2000 blocks, roughly five hours and forty minutes. This allows regular users of the network to vote for their favorite delegate but to regain access to their tokens in a short time. Delegates play a crucial role in Lisk since they secure the network and process every transaction. As such, their commitment is expected to be even more meaningful. For this reason, the waiting time for delegates voting for themselves (self-votes) is 30 days.The computation of the delegate weights is also modified to account for the amount of self-votes cast by delegates. The new delegate weight is computed as the minimum between ten times the delegate’s self-votes and all the votes received by the delegate (self-votes plus votes from other accounts). This means that the delegate weight must contain at least 10% of self-votes.This new way of computing the delegate weight makes it necessary for delegates to have at least a portion of their tokens locked. This makes delegates more accountable for the blocks they forge and will be an additional incentive to run a safe and secure setup.New Selection MechanismThe LIP Use Randao-based scheme to include standby delegates and reorder delegate list introduces two new forging slots in each round. The round length will be now 103 blocks. Those two new slots will be assigned to two standby delegates randomly and proportionally to their delegate weight.The second DPoS LIP defines how to choose those two standby delegates and analyzes the expected number of forging slots one can expect. If the sum all the standby delegate weight is 1,000,000 and you have weight 10,000, you would be selected every 50 rounds on average. This corresponds to fifty blocks per month. Of course this is only an estimation — the actual number of blocks you get to forge as a delegate will be random and will depend on the number and the total weight of standby delegates. But, in general, this improvement makes it possible for most of the registered delegates to forge blocks, which will encourage them to run a node and participate in the network security.Punishment for Protocol ViolationsThe third LIP Punish BFT violations introduces a way for users to report delegates creating contradicting blocks to the network. The roadmap milestone “Security and Reliability” introduced the BFT set of protocol changes. The BFT LIP specifies which rules the delegates should follow to avoid proof of stake problems like the nothing at stake problem. However, encouraging honesty among delegates and punishing misbehavior is currently not part of the protocol. This new LIP introduces a transaction type called “Proof of Misbehavior”. This transaction allows users to reveal to the network any BFT protocol violation by a delegate. This proposal also specifies the consequences of a breach of protocol.In short, a punished delegate will be stopped from forging for 90 days. Its self-votes will be locked for 90 days and all of its voters votes will be locked for 30 days.This is a strong incentive to respect the BFT rules. Trying any kind of violation will have a very little chance of being profitable and this mechanism will help the network to remove all delegates running faulty or non-reliable software.There is a common critic towards such punishments: it trades some liveliness for security. Indeed it is now less harmful to miss a block than to double forge. This is a wanted feature in our network. Missed blocks are only a mild issue which is mitigated by running a stable server on a stable internet connection. On the other hand, consensus violations can be used to mount an attack on the entire chain and should be totally avoided.Main benefits of the new DPoS ConsensusNow that we have a general overview of the proposed DPoS improvements, let’s have a look at how the three new LIPs will achieve the five properties we outlined at the beginning:Decentralization: This proposal states that one LSK can only be locked to one delegate. Delegates are incentivized to campaign independently and to break any coalition to attain the maximum possible rewards. This is complemented by the inclusion of standby delegates slots. Users will now have a greater incentive to register a delegate to get some block rewards, hence increasing the decentralization of the network.Open & Fair: In line with the previous point, the new DPoS system means a voting system based on proportional representation. Having two standby delegates spots every round allows delegates with smaller delegate weight to get a definite chances of forging new blocks. Assuming one million LSK voting for standby delegates, a delegate with a delegate weight of around 10,000 LSK can expect to forge fifty blocks per month. This is a vast improvement compared to the current situation where delegates need more than 25,000,000 LSK to start forging their first block.Security: One of the key features of the proposed voting system is that it introduces delegates and voters accountability. Delegates who want to be selected as forging delegates have to lock a considerable part of their stake as self-votes. This automatically creates a commitment of the delegates with the network, if they do not comply with the protocol rules they may lose access to some of their tokens and their right to forge for a good amount of time. In the same way, voters are incentivized to vote for good and productive delegates. This concept is enforced by the LIP Punish BFT violations, as it creates incentives for users to monitor the network searching for misbehaving delegates.Efficiency: The introduction of locking votes would mean a great improvement in the block processing efficiency. The complexity pitfall explained in the “Reasons to improve our DPoS mechanism” section above disappears in the proposed voting system, since the votes submitted by an account are locked and cannot change with any other transaction type. This basically means that the delegate weights are updated much more efficiently, which in general implies faster bock processing.Flexibility: With the new proposal, users of Lisk can decide how much support their account gives to each of their preferred delegates. This way, users can define a voting strategy depending on the amount of tokens they have and their confidence in the different delegates.Want to Know More?We invite all community members to go to the forum, read the LIPs and give feedback. This blog post is a general overview and more information is available in the different threads. We are always happy to hear your feedback and will be present on the Research Forum for further scientific discussions on those LIPs.Lisk Research TeamLisk is on a mission to enable you to create decentralized, efficient, and transparent blockchain applications. Join us:Lisk DiscordSDK Page and NewsletterLisk ResearchTwitterOur Path to Changing the Voting System was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 09. 30

Financial Update — August 2019

Financial Update — August 2019Transparency was always at the core of what Lisk does. Between regular Development Updates and responsive community engagement, we want to keep you in the loop about everything going on behind the scenes at the Lisk Foundation. Starting with the month of August, we are excited to bring back regular Financial Updates.The Financial Updates will be published on the second Thursday of the following month. They will help you gain insight into the Foundation’s current financial health with a breakdown of total assets held, expenses and portfolio changes had during the previous month. The Lisk Foundation is registered in Zug, Switzerland — because of this, all financial reports are created in Swiss Francs (CHF). You can find the most up-to-date conversions here.Total Assets Held by the Lisk FoundationIn this section, you can check up on all fiat currency and cryptocurrency assets currently in possession of the foundation. We will also use this part of the update to let you know about any major changes in our portfolio.Crypto Asset Liquidation in AugustThe Lisk Foundation is liquidating its assets in an on-going strategy to provide enough liquidity for the projects expenses. Currently, we are following the rule to have enough fiat to cover 12 months of expenses.In the month of July, we have deposited the following cryptocurrencies to Bitcoin Suisse for liquidation:4.488,71406161 BCH on July 5th8.488,69406759 BSV on July 5th8.488,6940663 BTG on July 10th84.886,9406727 BCD on July 10thWe liquidated them into:1.026.612,11 CHF in July1.770.977,32 CHF in AugustThis totaled at 2.797.721,90 CHF.To sustain 12 months in FIAT, we are looking to further liquidate some of our crypto assets. We will liquidate all remaining 4000 BCH, and enough BTC to sustain approximately 12 months again.Total Expenditures for the Month of AugustIn the expenditures section of the Financial Update, you can see how much the Foundation has spent on various aspects of Lisk’s growth. For your convenience, we have divided this section into four areas:Development — by far the biggest area of expenditure by the Lisk Foundation, this encompasses everything spent on the research, development, and design of Lisk Core, SDK, Hub, Mobile and Explorer.Marketing — this key area of growth for Lisk includes not only traditional marketing like public relations, or performance, but extends to everything spent on business development, event management, and creative design. It also includes our new Developer Relations department.Bounties & Sponsorships — the stronger the Lisk community, the stronger our blockchain is going to be. Under this area of expenditure we outline all money spent on bug bounties, supporting proof-of-concept blockchain applications built with the Lisk SDK, or joint efforts with community members like the Lisk Center in Utrecht.Operations — here, we mention all expenses needed in the day-to-day running of the Lisk Foundation, such as salaries, office costs, or administrative contractors dealing with accounting or legal compliance.Disclaimer: The information contained in the monthly Financial Updates are primarily of informational value. Minor differences from their actual state may occur due to different moments of booking of certain inflows and expenses, as well as their possible subsequent corrections. Thus, this information cannot serve as an accurate reference point to the exact state of finances of the Lisk Foundation and the costs associated with developing the Lisk Project.Lisk is on a mission to enable you to create decentralized, efficient, and transparent blockchain applications. Join us:Lisk DiscordSDK Page and NewsletterLisk ResearchTwitterFinancial Update — August 2019 was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 09. 12

Lisk Community Assets to Be...

After having considered all options, we have decided to not move forward with Lisk’s community fund. Today, we will discuss the main reasons why the community fund is discontinued. Starting on Wednesday, September 18th, we will begin the process of returning all donations to the original senders.The ReasonsThe community fund was first announced in a blog post in late 2016. Its main objective was to have a decentralized funding vehicle for ventures inside the Lisk ecosystem. There are two main reasons for shutting down Lisk’s community fund — legal and strategic.First off, the community fund was announced before the creation of the Lisk Foundation in Zug. During that time, the voluntary donations to the community fund were to be sent to the Lisk address 15841793714384967784L. After the Lisk Foundation was going to be set up, the plan was for the funds to be handed over to the newly found organization as their custodian.Unfortunately, setting up a community fund and turning it into a decentralized autonomous organization (DAO) would have increased the legal requirements many times over. This would mean that time and financial resources needed would likely exceed the value held by the community fund.It’s important to note that the Foundation never controlled the funds and remained as its temporary escrow. The funds remained intact throughout the entire duration of the fund.The community fund was also closely interlinked with the first development roadmap for the Lisk ecosystem. Since that date, we have come up with a new roadmap which does not include the implementation of, for example, the Decentralised Voting Mechanism. Instead, it focuses on hitting important milestones on the way to the fully interoperable blockchain ecosystem.What Happens NowStarting next week Wednesday, September 18th, we will begin with the reimbursement process. First, we will contact all donors known to us in order to confirm their Lisk address is still valid.If you were in a small minority of donors not using a registered delegate account for the donation, we don’t have the information to verify who has donated. In this case, please come forward and send a private message to our Community Manager Mat (@Mat#5761) on our Lisk Discord. Mat will let you know the required steps to retrieve your donated LSK.Once we have received your confirmation, we will process your donation back to the original address.We have received multiple requests from people wishing to donate their LSK donation into the Lisk Foundation. If you wish to donate your LSK to the Lisk Foundation, please let us know when we contact you.Lisk is on a mission to enable you to create decentralized, efficient, and transparent blockchain applications. Join us:Lisk DiscordSDK Page and NewsletterLisk ResearchTwitterLisk Community Assets to Be Reimbursed to Donors was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 09. 11

Lisk SDK 2.3.0 Out, BFT Con...

The month of August saw our developer teams progress with the SDK and the Lisk community get busy with experimenting with our new toolkit. Here are the main takeaways:SDKLisk SDK 2.3.0 released along with two patches (2.3.1 and 2.3.2).The above releases are focused on the new partial mesh network topology.We explore the Byzantine Fault Tolerance (BFT) consensus the team is working on for the next versions of Lisk SDK.Lisk BuildersLisk Center Utrecht community members Marc, Eric and Albert are working on Lisk.Bike, a proof of concept application built using the Alpha SDK.Community members StellarDynamic, Tony, Koreben3, Lemii, Jackson Roberts and Matthew set up SideChain Solutions, providing tools, proof of concepts, and tutorials for the Lisk Ecosystem.Moosty released their whitepaper for Lisk Directory 0.2, a sidechain project bringing greater transparency to delegate contributions.Korben3 launched the incredibly handy, Lisk Node Monitor Bot, a tool providing updates on node missed blocks straight to Telegram, making maintaining performant nodes more.UILisk Hub 1.20.0 was released with the Ledger Nano X hardware wallet support.Lisk Hub 1.21.0 has finished development, will contain German language support and a discreet mode.Lisk Mobile 1.2.1 is out, includes a crucial BTC crash fix.Lisk 1.3.0 is in development, includes various performance and UX improvements.SDKLast month, we released Lisk SDK 2.3.0 and two patches for this version (2.3.1 and 2.3.2) which fixed a few issues. Those releases are focused on the new partial mesh network topology — we already described its features in the last Development Update, however we want to highlight a few improvements:Requesting data only from outbound peers. Nodes will now only make requests to outbound peers. This reduces the attack vector, when many malicious peers connect to a target peer and occupy its inbound connections.Network Ready Event. The P2P library fires an `EVENT_NETWORK_READY` event, which signals when the node has successfully connected to peers. The node can then start syncing and making requests to the network.The default `peerSelectForRequest` function now simply shuffles `peerList` and selects one, instead of using a height histogram.New class `Peer Book` handles peer management. We have new peers and tried peers list, each of which has a specified number of buckets. Peers are added to these buckets based on a hash of their IP prefix and node’s secret. This makes a node more resilient against local attacks. This structure is influenced by a Bitcoin implementation.Peer eviction strategies. The buckets in each peer lists use various eviction strategies for `newPeers` and `triedPeers` that will defend us against receiving lists of invalid / fake IPs.Partial meshThe nodes are keeping connections with a subset of peers in the network instead of all of them. This will drastically lower the network traffic and number of connections and allow network to scale regarding number of nodes.The graph below shows how the network will look like from the point of view of a new 2.1.x version node, with the older versions still in the network. The green ones are the new 2.1.x nodes whereas blue ones are older versions. The size of a node indicates the number of peer connections it has.The second graph below shows how the network will look like with different versions of nodes. We can clearly see that the older versions tend to make a lot of connections and the new nodes are making fewer connections, which reduce both traffic and the number of connections in the network.What’s next?For the next versions of Lisk SDK, the team is working on implementing the Byzantine Fault Tolerance (BFT) consensus. Let’s explore the progress made.Protocol SpecsWe are making progress with the Protocol Specs tool which allows us to validate the protocol with test data we generate. The tool is not part of the BFT by default, but it will allow us to validate the protocol changes that come with the new BFT implementation.To give an example, the protocol tells us to invalidate a transaction if your account’s balance is insufficient. We can then use the Protocol Specs which is a set of generators that outputs JSON representing both positive and negative scenarios for our protocol. The JSON output contains the initial blockchain and account states, an input block, the final blockchain and account states (after applying said input). We can then feed this data to tests or other tools, in order to validate if any changes to the codebase break the protocol.We are working on adding more scenarios, the full issue description with the list of tasks can be found on GitHub under issue #4087.Replacing Rounds Module with DPoSCurrently, we are halfway through replacing the old rounds module with the new DPoS one. Some important functionality, like generating a list of delegates for a round, has been finalized and already implemented.At the moment, we are replacing two core functions `rounds.tick` and `rounds.backwardTick` by the `apply` and `undo` variants exposed by the DPoS module. Again, the full progress can be found on Github, issue #3686.Processing BlocksThe new block processor is currently in the design stage and will be implemented as part of the BFT changes. The block processor is part of the chain module and should allow for more flexibility when dealing with different block versions.We have come up with a pipeline pattern which allows to register multiple functions as part of each step in the block processing. Next, we can define a different block processor per each block version, in order to be able to validate different block versions. This means that the chain module is responsible for selecting the correct block processor for a particular block.Block processor pull request, which is still under review, contains 237 commits and over 6000 lines of code changes.Other Minor ChangesFilter has been added for account entity to allow searching in `account.asset` field: `asset_contains` and `asset_exists` — issue #3990BlockSlots class has been moved into the DPoS module — issue #3789Event is emitted once block is finalized from BFT module — issue #3908We are looking forward to the next month where the new block processor will play a key role and allow us to work on replacing the rounds module completely, but also start work on the synchronizer mechanisms as described in the BFT LIP.Reorganization / Refactoring of CodeNew `Utils` folder organised with files named after verbs (sanitize, validate, select, miscellaneous).All the constants and events were gathered into a separate file at the root level to make them more accessible and make the code more readable.Functions shared between `newPeers` and `triedPeers` lists were moved to a separate base class.Improve the way of how the library exports its features through a root-level index file.Lisk BuildersWith the beginning of the AlphaSDK Phase at the end of July, the last couple of weeks were extremely busy for Lisk Builders. We had a whole range of projects being worked on, from Tic Tac Toe to Lisk Bike, as well as node management and development tools. Here is the run down for the month:Lisk BikeLisk Center Utrecht community members Marc, Eric and Albert are working on Lisk.Bike, a proof of concept application built using the Alpha SDK. With bicycles being a hot commodity in the Netherlands, it’s only fitting that the LCU community aims to build a JavaScript application and use the Lisk blockchain for the data registration. For the latest news and updates, follow the Lisk Center Utrecht on Twitter.Tic Tac ToeCommunity members StellarDynamic, Tony, Koreben3, Lemii, Jackson Roberts and Matthew set up SideChain Solutions, providing tools, proof of concepts, and tutorials for the Lisk Ecosystem. First up to be launched was a Tic Tac Toe game by Korben3 along with an accompanying tutorial.Lisk DirectoryMoosty released their whitepaper for Lisk Directory 0.2, a sidechain project bringing greater transparency to delegate contributions.EliteX’s DecredEliteX have launched a new staking service for Decred as part of their exchange. They estimate that this could bring users a 12% ROI.ToolsKorben3 launched the incredibly handy, Lisk Node Monitor Bot, a tool providing updates on node missed blocks straight to Telegram, making maintaining performant nodes more convenient. JesusTheHun also contributed Lisk Bootstrap, a tool using nvm and Docker Compose to smoothout setting up a local development blockchain.User InterfacesLisk Hub 1.20.0 was released with the Ledger Nano X hardware wallet support.We have integrated Ledger Nano X hardware wallet support into Lisk Hub in order to enable users to sign in to their accounts using this hardware wallet, see the history of their transactions and make new translations. Ledger Nano X is a popular new hardware device and we hope users can benefit from this integration. The interface of this hardware wallet is pretty much similar to its predecessor Ledger Nano S. If you have used the previous model, you’ll have no problem finding your way around new model.We have made significant improvements to how are our users notified about new releases. Ever since the first release of Lisk Hub, our users were automatically notified when there was a new release available with a pop-up window. Through the feedback from our users, we identified certain user experience flaws in the process. The main problem was that the pop-up window was distracting the user from whatever they were currently doing. To prevent this issue, we are now showing only a banner notification with a summary of the new release. This allows the user to finish whatever they were doing and only afterwards to pay attention to the new release update.Only once the user clicks “Read more”, they will be shown a modal dialog with the full changelog and an action button to install the latest release. This feature is currently supported on MacOS and Windows.There are possible future improvements to the new release feature. When the user starts the download of the new version, we could show progress of the download also in the main window, not only on the app icon in the Dock. We could also work on implementing this feature on Linux because the support of auto updates of Electron-based apps on Linux is a lot better since we first implemented this feature. If you would like to see these or any other improvements, please let us know through Lisk Hub user feedback form, which is also accessible directly from Lisk Hub main menu.Lisk Hub 1.21.0 has finished development, will contain German language support and discreet mode.We are also excited to present our very first localization of Lisk Hub tailored for the German market. From now on, all German speaking users can change the interface language to Deutsch for their ease of usage. Hope you will like it, ff German is not your preferred language, keep your eyes peeled — there will be more languages and currencies coming in the future. Similar to other configuration options, the language selector is accessible through the settings page.We have also added a security feature to Lisk Hub — the discreet mode. If you’re a user of Lisk Mobile, you’re already familiar with this feature. Discreet mode enables you to view your account and manage transactions, while sensitive information like balance totals and transaction amounts are hidden.With this in mind, we add discreet mode feature and now all users can check their accounts without worry in be in public areas, all transactions amounts and balance are blur except those transactions and balance that are not related to the owner.How does it Work?There are 2 ways to enable or disable the discreet mode: in Sign-in page and in Settings page. By default the discreet mode is disabled, meaning that if users sign in to Lisk Hub without activating this option, their account balance and transaction amounts are visible. But if they activate the discreet mode by checking the option in the sign-in page, all your sensitive information will be blurred out before you are navigated to dashboard.Discreet Mode in the Sign-in PageThe option is located below the passphrase input fields, the interaction is through a checkbox and the text label is “Enable discreet mode when signed in (optional)”.Discreet Mode in the Settings PageThe discreet mode option is located under the security section. This option is available in two places, settings and sign in pages, only to make it easier accessible. Once the discreet mode is enabled, you can check the dashboard, wallet, and transactions details safely in public places.Lisk MobileLisk Mobile 1.2.1 is out, includes a crucial BTC crash fixWe have released Lisk 1.2.1. This version includes a patch that fixes a crash in the app which some users experienced when removing the BTC integration. With this release BTC integration can be added and removed without any unexpected behavior.Lisk 1.3.0 is in development, includes various performance and UX improvementsFor the past few weeks we have been working on the latest version of Lisk Mobile: 1.3.0. This version will come with a number of bug fixes and enhancements that will improve the user experience. These changes include a better behavior of the keyboard accessory button on iPhone X, a performance improvement thanks to an update on the navigation library, and a few other UX changes. We have also taken this time to improve the code quality of the project.Lisk is on a mission to enable you to create decentralized, efficient, and transparent blockchain applications. Join us:Lisk DiscordSDK Page and NewsletterLisk ResearchTwitterLisk SDK 2.3.0 Out, BFT Consensus in Development & Hub 1.20.0’s Ledger Nano X Support was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 09. 05

Everything You Need To Know...

August is a special month for Berlin’s blockchain industry. Thousands of attendees travel from all over Germany (and beyond)to its capital for a fix of developer conferences, hackathons and meetups at the Berlin Blockchain Week. Around the city, local projects organize events filled with scientific discussions, technical talks and business updates. Lisk has deep ties to Berlin and its blockchain scene, with most Lightcurve’s employees based in the German capital. Today, we’d like to give you a rundown of where you can expect to meet us in the coming weeks:For your convenience, we’ve divided our planner into three categories: hosted, speaker, and attended events.Hosted eventsLearn how to code your own custom cashback transactions with the Lisk SDK during our online webinarJuly was a big month for Lisk, with the beginning of the Alpha SDK phase of our development roadmap. We are excited to have the first version of our blockchain application building toolkit ready for the attendees of the Berlin Blockchain Week. This means that the first event hosted by Lisk in August will be the Lisk SDK Webinar. Rachel, our Tech Evangelist, will give an introduction to the Lisk SDK and show how to code your own custom transactions. Afterwards, there will be a short Q&A session. Make sure to attend the webinar on August 9th at 10:00am CEST (Berlin time) on YouTube. If you cannot make it to the online event, you can always check it out later by subscribing to our channel.Give feedback on Lisk Hub, Mobile, and website’s design by joining the User Interfaces Usability TestingAs described in our recent Lisk Development Update, we recently started a collaboration with Usability Testessen group in Berlin in order to test our user-facing products and website. With their support, we will be hosting the next event on August 21st at our offices in the Atrium Tower. There will be 6 testers for each product and Lisk will be present with 3 stations for: Hub, Mobile and website. Besides Lisk’s products, ten other projects will get their apps and websites tested. This is a great opportunity to learn from each other. If you would be interested in becoming a tester, make sure to register on their website.Last Usability Testing workshop took place on July 24th.Get a deep understanding of the Lisk SDK and meet the devs at our local workshopLast up, we will be hosting the Lisk SDK Workshop for local developers on August 28th. We will begin with an overview of the SDK’s capabilities, followed by a hands-on coding challenge. The scope of this workshop is for developers to get a deep understanding of the Lisk Alpha SDK, as well as having a hands-on experience using the SDK. Attendees will also be able to meet our development team and ask any questions they have about the topic. This is just the first Lisk SDK Workshop a series of hands-on meetups coming up and heading towards the Lisk Dev Event later this year. More info on that soon. Due to the high amount of required resources from our team, the spots are limited, so make sure to RSVP for this event on our meetup page.Speaker eventsAli and Julian will discuss Lisk Design Thinking at a UI/UX Designers MeetupThe blockchain industry is developing very fast. This means its UI products become more complex too. As part of our Design Thinking efforts, Lisk’s Design team took considerable time to understand the users and the challenges that come together with the process of designing for blockchain users. The work that has been done so far in researching, prototyping, testing and implementing the design changes will be showcased during the meetup organized by UI/UX Designers Meetup group on August 20th. Julian, Lisk’s Head of Design and Ali, Lisk’s Head of User Interfaces will present outcomes of the Design Thinking process and share their experiences. If you would like to hear some specific insights about their thinking process, make sure you RSVP.Rachel will introduce the Lisk SDK to developers at a Coding Berlin meetupAnother great opportunity for Lisk during the Berlin Blockchain Week is the Coding Berlin Meetup on August 27th where Rachel will be presenting an introduction to the Alpha SDK. Coding Berlin group aims to become the hubfor Berlin’s code community, therefore their meetups are only focused on developers and hands-on talks. Rachel’s presentation consists of a demo showcasing how to bootstrap your own blockchain and defining custom transactions. The goal of this talk is to onboard developers into the Lisk Alpha SDK and connect with the local developer community. Come and have a chat with Rachel about the Alpha SDK!Jan will discuss consensus algorithms at a Humboldt University blockchain meetupBlockchain Nights series at Weizenbaum Institute, part of the Humboldt University in Berlin, aims to attract students, researchers and start-ups from Berlin to address topics like business, economics and technology from both theorists and practitioners. The organizers host a monthly discussion series of debates related to cryptocurrencies, blockchain technology and smart contracts. During the Blockchain Week, on August 29th, Weizenbaum Institute will host an event about Security of Smart Contracts Platforms with talks by Research Associates and industry players, followed by a panel discussion. Jan Hackfeld, Head of Research at Lisk, will be presenting a comparison of consensus algorithms and ways to incentivize an honest consensus participation. If you are interested in attending this meetup and hearing more about consensus algorithms, register on the Blockchain Nights website.Attended eventsBlockchance Conference will take place in Hamburg on August 16–17th. The event’s key topics are the future of economics and the future of society. Lothar (Head of Operations), Matthias (Head of Business Development) and Frederic (Legal Counsel) will represent Lisk during this conference with the scope of staying up-to-date with industry related topics and networking with key players from the German blockchain scene.Several big events will take place during the Berlin Blockchain Week in August and Lisk employees take this opportunity to keep up-to-date with the industry, to network with important players from Germany and abroad and also to talk about Lisk with other blockchain enthusiasts. Lisk’s Research team will be attending the Web3Summit on August 19–21st at Funkhaus Berlin. With a line-up of high quality speakers for presentations, AMA sessions and workshops, Web3 Summit is a conference open for community to create their own programme. On August 22nd, Rachel is going to be present at the DappCon event at the Technical University in Berlin. This global developer conference has as focus decentralized applications, tooling and foundational infrastructure on Ethereum. If you are there, make sure to get in touch with our team.A recap of the learnings, interesting discussions, and outcomes of the Berlin Blockchain Week events, as well as other meetups and conferences in August will be published after the ceremonies have concluded.Lisk is on a mission to enable developers to create decentralized, efficient, and transparent blockchain applications. Join us:Lisk DiscordSDK Page and NewsletterLisk ResearchTwitterEverything You Need To Know About Lisk at Berlin Blockchain Week was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 08. 06

The long-awaited Alpha SDK ...

Hey Liskers,Last month was very important for us, as we achieved a significant milestone with the launch of our long-awaited Alpha SDK. Here are the main takeaways:Lisk SDK:First version of Lisk SDK released, creation of PoC decentralized applications is now possible. We are waiting for your feedback!SDK specific documentation and tutorials have also been released.Development of Lisk SDK 2.2.0 is completed, it will be released tomorrow.Lisk Core 2.3.0 is nearing completion, with only 5 features left.Lisk Network:Lisk Core 2.0.0 was released to Mainnet on July 24, 2019.Patch release Lisk Core 2.0.1 was released to fix P2P-related vulnerabilities.Lisk Builders:Lisk Center Utrecht (LCU) launched a new website and started crowdfunding campaign.Moosty announced plans of real delegate marketplace for Lisk and its future sidechains.Carbonara created a countdown tool for upcoming soft-fork on Mainnet.UI:Lisk Hub 1.19.0 and 1.19.1 released with support for Bitcoin (BTC) and a new design.The importance of User Experience and Design ThinkingLisk SDKLisk SDK 2.1.0 was released on July 24, 2019We published the Alpha SDK blog post explaining the details fully and next steps for feature releases. We have already started gathering your ideas on improving the developer experience for the Lisk SDK. If you want to share your feedback join us on Discord or open an issue on the lisk-sdk GitHub repository. If you have completed our Cashback tutorial, we would value your input via this short survey.Lisk SDK 2.2.0 will be released tomorrow, August 2Development of Lisk SDK 2.2.0 is now complete, which means we will release this version tomorrow. Its main focus was technical debt reduction, benefitting experienced developers who want to modify the Lisk SDK themselves. The codebase is clearer and easier to understand.Previously there was no way to run module-specific database migrations (issue #3197), so we added this capability. Now database migrations can be registered and executed per module — allowing developers of custom modules to add their own bespoke database migrations.We removed many third-party dependencies, reducing the risk of malicious code hidden in dependencies and making both the build and installation process faster.We migrated the codebase to ES6 standard, replaced callbacks with async/await. Async/await allows asynchronous code to be read like synchronous/procedural code, so it’s easier to understand. Here is a nice article which highlights differences between callbacks, promises and async/await.Circular dependencies were removed. Modules that are dependent on each other is considered an anti-pattern.Lisk Core 2.3.0 nears completion with 5 features leftThe next version, Lisk Core 2.3.0 is almost completed. It brings changes to the peer to peer communication (P2P), making the network robust and more secure. There are only 5 features left and 4 of them already have pull requests open:Peer address book with peer buckets (in review)Improvement to consensus calculationInbound peer eviction based on netgroup (in review)Use a random secret as part of hash when choosing peer buckets (in review)Improvement to peer selection mechanism for the connection phase (in review)Lisk NetworkThe soft-fork will trigger at block height 10,000,000 on August 23Lisk Core 2.0.0 was released to Mainnet on July 24, 2019, the soft-fork will trigger automatically at block height 10,000,000, on August 23, 2019. If you are running a Mainnet node, make sure you have upgraded ahead of this time.Yesterday we released a patch, Lisk Core 2.0.1, to fix P2P-related vulnerabilities submitted through our Bug Bounty Program, details are available here.Lisk BuildersAs well as hosting last week’s Lisk Meetup, the Lisk Center Utrecht (LCU) launched a new website, check it out for the latest initiatives and events. LCU also uploaded a video of Rachel’s presentation on their YouTube channel. They are currently running a crowdfunding campaign, read Crowdfund2020 article if you want to know more about their current and future plans.Community project, Moosty announced they are going to create a concept for a real delegate marketplace for Lisk and its future sidechains.Lisk delegate Carbonara created this handy countdown tool for the upcoming soft-fork.UILisk Hub 1.19.1 released to fix a bug and improve onboarding of mainstream usersAfter releasing Lisk Hub 1.19.0 we discovered a blocking bug and decided to release a patch version to resolve this issue. Lisk Hub 1.19.1 resolves duplicated transactions showing up in transactions history of the accounts you search. We’ve used this opportunity to update some messages in on-boarding widgets so they’re more helpful for new users.Lisk Hub 1.19.0 final version was releasedLast month we released the final version of Lisk Hub 1.19.0 with several cool features. You can find out more about them in our previous dev update.The Importance of User ExperienceDesign is not just about making things pretty. It should be better understood as a helpful guide, or loyal companion. This is especially important in blockchain where design supports a very complex technology. Great design builds a relationship with every user and intuitively guides them through every single step of their journey. What is happening? What just happened? What will happen next? The answer should be as obvious as possible.The Importance of Design Thinking for LiskThe industry is evolving as fast as ever. Between managing tokens, Delegated Proof-of-Stake, or using hardware wallets, user interactions with our UI products are increasing and getting more and more complex. This means we needed to find a way to take back control in a user-centric manner. Design thinking is the answer here. This school preaches taking the time to understand the user and their challenges, followed by thorough testing and prototyping before final implementation.On July 24, we took part in a Usability Testing event organized by TestessenThis project connects product developers and users together at regular usability events in German cities. Lisk had a station where we could test Lisk Hub with six people who never heard about Lisk and had limited knowledge about blockchain. Immediately we found some design aspects to work on.For example in the Account Creation process it was evident that the passphrase was a difficult concept for most testers. Most users had trouble recognizing the importance of storing it safely, and were automatically convinced that it could be somehow recovered. The most frequent behavior was, after choosing the avatar, trying to pick one of the 12-words, instead of assuming it as a complete passphrase.For mainstream users unfamiliar with blockchain, we learned that our current descriptions are not sufficient, and we need to do more to educate and guide new users, both from the UX and UI perspective. Right now this pain point is on the ideation phase of the Design Thinking process. There, we will prototype solutions for this specific problem to test on the next session. Nevertheless, the insight is as critical as valuable, and it would have never happened if the test would have been conducted with any of the other user groups.Since we saw a lot of value in Testessen Usability Testing, we have decided to host an event in our office in August. There, we will test Lisk Hub, Lisk Mobile, and the Lisk website.The initiative is called “Fortnightly Usability Sessions” and is aligned with the completion of each UI sprint. The goal is to establish a solid, recurring time frame for feedback loops, to make sure we are always open for feedback and get challenged in our ideas on how to keep improving our products. During each session, we will test or interview a maximum of 5 users around a specific flexible topic which will be defined beforehand based on the progress of the UI roadmap.Your way to contributeLast week, we started our efforts to recruit users for our fortnightlies. We wanted to thank you all for the positive response of the community and insist, one more time, that if you would like to participate from time to time, giving us your feedback, please don’t hesitate to send an email to us at design [at] lightcurve [dot] ioLisk is on a mission to enable developers to create decentralized, efficient, and transparent blockchain applications. Join us:Lisk DiscordSDK Page and NewsletterLisk ResearchTwitterThe long-awaited Alpha SDK got released, Lisk SDK 2.2.0 already completed was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 08. 01

Lisk Core 2.0.1. Released t...

Lisk Core 2.0.1. Released to Fix a P2P-Related Network VulnerabilityToday, we released Lisk Core 2.0.1 to both Testnet and Mainnet. This patch was released because of a vulnerability in the way nodes manage peer lists. This in turn led to unsustainable growth in CPU and memory usage for all nodes in the network. This update is for node operators only — all the funds are safe and there is no need for any action from Lisk Network users.On July 15th, we received a Bug Bounty Program submission with a number of vulnerabilities. We accepted three of them as valid. Two out of the three are related to the P2P layer of our application. One of them was a possible vector of an attack related to spamming the network with a huge number of invalid peers. In the meantime, another issue was open on GitHub that highlighted a problem with unreachable peers not being removed. We wanted to fix all the P2P-related issues as part of the upcoming Lisk Core 2.1.0 release (based on Lisk SDK 2.3.0). This is because this release will already bring a lot of changes and improvements to our P2P protocol and make some of those attack vectors no longer possible.However, two days ago, a slightly different variation of an invalid peers spam attack was executed on the Testnet network. Almost 30,000 invalid peers were announced to the network and then propagated through over the following hours. Nodes kept trying to connect to all the peers at once and the amount of so many simultaneous connections being opened in a short period of time overwhelmed them. Testnet lost stability because nodes were too busy to forge and validate blocks on time. Shortly after, we received two additional submissions for the Bug Bounty Program which described that attack in detail.Because the vulnerability was disclosed publicly and it also made both networks vulnerable, we decided to release a patch with the following mitigations:Remove the peer on the first failed connection attempt (previously peers were kept as disconnected and node were trying to re-establish the connection every 30 seconds).When the node is discovering new peers (through remote procedure call list) it will accept only 100 (previously it was accepting all of them, even if the amount were huge).For the peers discovery process, the node is announcing only connected peers in response to RPC calls from the other node (previously it returned up to 100 known peers, regardless of the connection status)In consensus calculation and when sending requests to other peers, we pick only one node per IP address (this prevents many nodes from the same IP address having a negative impact on the network).The situation on the Testnet is stabilizing, as node operators are upgrading pretty quickly. The full release notes are now available on GitHub.Lisk Development TeamLisk is on a mission to enable developers to create decentralized, efficient, and transparent blockchain applications. Join us:SDK Page and NewsletterLisk SDK GitterLisk ResearchLisk DiscordTwitterLisk Core 2.0.1. Released to Fix a P2P-related Network Vulnerability was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 07. 31

Alpha SDK Phase Officially ...

Today, we are happy to announce the release of Lisk SDK 2.1.0. This marks the beginning of the Alpha SDK Phase on our Development Roadmap. This phase will allow developers to create their own proof-of-concept blockchain applications. Developers will also be included in the SDK’s design by being able to provide feedback on how their experience can be improved.What is Alpha SDK?The goal of the Lisk SDK (Software Development Kit) is to provide developers with a set of tools and libraries that will make the process of creation and customization of blockchain applications quick and easy.Architecture of the Alpha SDKThe architecture of the Lisk SDK is designed in a way that can be extended to fit a wide variety of blockchain application use-cases. There has been a few minor changes made to the initial proposal:The originally proposed system component, responsible for maintaining application state, was implemented as part of the application controller. This was done in order to eliminate the risk of having an inconsistent application state distributed across different modules within the application.We introduced a new concept of public versus private actions. Public actions, like remote procedure calls, are allowed from other machines on the Lisk Network, but certain actions are restricted to the local machine only. This provided a greater level of security than what was originally proposed.What can I create using the Alpha version of Lisk SDK?Lisk SDK 2.1.0 allows you to create your own blockchain application based on the Lisk Protocol. This means the new blockchain will contain the same set of features available on the Lisk Network, for example Delegated Proof of Stake consensus, P2P communication based on WebSocket protocol, native support for multisignature transactions, and much more. However, the most exciting part is the possibility to customize this new blockchain to fit to a specific use-case. This can be done by modifying protocol parameters and adding custom business logic on top of it.Create new custom transaction typesWe provided developers a way to define their own custom transaction types in which they can implement the required business logic for their blockchain use-case. The custom transaction types are an extension to the default set of transactions that is already part of the Lisk Protocol. This includes:Balance transfer (type 0)Second passphrase registration (type 1)Delegate registration (type 2)Delegate vote (type 3)Multisignature account registration (type 4)The Lisk SDK provides a base transaction which developers can extend. The custom, blockchain application logic can be defined according to an abstract interface that is common across all transaction types.Customize blockchain parameters for your use-caseDevelopers are also able to configure protocol-level parameters for a newly created blockchain. Currently, for the initial release of the Alpha SDK, we are supporting four of them (we will allow more in the future):Block time — The time in seconds between each new block that is created.Epoch time — The time in seconds that have elapsed since the genesis block was created, offset from Unix Epoch Time (00:00:00 Thursday, 1 January 1970).Block rewards — The amount of new tokens issued with every forged block. Developers can define milestones — specific block heights that when reached will enforce a change to the amount of tokens issued.Block size — The maximum number of transactions that can be included in a block.The above mentioned blockchain parameters can be set only at the point of genesis (creation of the new blockchain network). Changing any of these later will cause a soft/hard fork on the network.How to get startedThere are few ways to start building your application with the Lisk SDK:The easiest and recommended one is to install lisk-sdk NPM package, it’s just a single command:Lisk SDK consists of many packages. If you need a single functionality — you can install a specific package only. Available packages are listed at Lisk Elements Documentation.When you want to modify some of the packages, you can also clone the repository and build Lisk SDK yourself, this is an advanced way and we will provide documentation for it at a later stage.Regardless of which way will you go with, before, you have to install some system dependencies, everything is covered in the Lisk SDK documentation.Documentation, examples and tutorialsThe release comes with an updated documentation and GitHub READMEs. Each README file contains a brief description of the underlying package with instructions on how to: install, configure, test, benchmark and contribute to the codebase. Together with the documentation, we also provided two example blockchain applications, each with its own tutorial, explaining how the application functions and how it was developed:Hello WorldCashbackJoin SDK discussion and provide feedback on your experience via our Gitter. Subscribe to the SDK newsletter on our website to receive updates, walkthroughs, and much more.The Alpha SDK will be rolled out in multiple releases over timeThe release of Lisk SDK 2.1.0 completes the Architecture and Design phase of our Development Roadmap. Now the Security and Reliability phase begins. This will comprise of:Lisk SDK 2.2.0 cleans up and refactors the existing codebase, so that further development can be done faster and with a greater level of confidenceLisk SDK 2.3.0 partially introduces a robust peer selection and banning mechanism.Lisk SDK 3.0.0 changes the consensus to BFT (Byzantine Fault Tolerance) which is more secure and guarantees blocks finality, mitigates transaction replay on different chains, removes redundant properties in transactions and finalises the work on introducing a robust peer selection and banning mechanism..As described in the previous blog post, Lisk Core will be released independently of Lisk SDK according to the release schedule below:Lisk Core 2.1.0 release will include Lisk SDK 2.3.0.Lisk Core 3.0.0 release will be directly based on Lisk SDK 3.0.0, which will include all of the work done in previous Lisk SDK releases.Lisk is on a mission to enable developers to create decentralized, efficient, and transparent blockchain applications. Join us:SDK Page and NewsletterLisk SDK GitterLisk ResearchLisk.chatTwitterLegal disclaimer: By using the Alpha release of the Lisk SDK, you acknowledge and agree that you have an adequate understanding of the risks associated with the use of the Alpha release of the Lisk SDK and that it is provided on an “as is” and “as available” basis, without any representations or warranties of any kind. To the fullest extent permitted by law, in no event shall the Lisk Foundation or other parties involved in the development of the Alpha release of the Lisk SDK have any liability whatsoever to any person for any direct or indirect loss, liability, cost, claim, expense or damage of any kind, whether in contract or in tort, including negligence, or otherwise, arising out of or related to the use of all or part of the Alpha release of the Lisk SDK.At this time we only recommend the Lisk SDK for proof-of-concept blockchain applications, i.e. a blockchain operating on a testnet. The only application built using the Lisk SDK currently feasible for production usage is Lisk Core, the client of the Lisk network itself. Please be advised we cannot guarantee blockchains created with the Alpha release of the Lisk SDK will remain compatible with our planned (beta/rc) releases. We hope you enjoy building your proof-of-concept blockchain applications using the Lisk SDK, and look forward to receiving your feedback and contributions during the alpha phase.Alpha SDK Phase Officially Begins with the Launch of Lisk SDK 2.1.0 was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 07. 24

Lisk Core 2.0.0 Released on...

Lisk Core 2.0.0 Released on Mainnet, Lisk SDK 2.0.0 Published on NPM, and a Software License ChangeWe released Lisk Core 2.0.0 to the Mainnet. The soft fork will trigger on August 23, 2019, an upgrade before this date is mandatory. The release has several breaking changes. It also completes a number of objectives on the Architecture and Design phase of our roadmap. We are changing our software license from GNU GPL v3.0 to a more permissive Apache 2.0. We have published Lisk SDK 2.0.0 to the NPM registry — custom transaction support comes with 2.1.0 scheduled for a release tomorrow.Today, we released Lisk Core 2.0.0 to the Mainnet. This is the first Lisk Core release built using the Lisk SDK. For this purpose, together with Lisk Core we also published the Lisk SDK to the NPM registry, with the same version number — 2.0.0. As we previously mentioned in the overview of the upcoming releases, this is the initial version of the Lisk SDK, without the support for custom transactions.Together with this release we completed following objectives of our Development Roadmap:Implement design pattern for protocol changeImprove transaction processing efficiencyCreate transactions elementCreate transaction pool elementAdd node dependency/management/configuration commandsWe decided to move Reduce technical debt within chain module objective to the next milestone — Security and Reliability. The work on this objective is done, however, this is not a requirement for Alpha SDK phase to begin and will be released later, with Lisk SDK 2.2.0.The last objective, Enable custom transaction support, is already implemented in Lisk SDK 2.1.0. Together with its release, the Architecture and Design milestone will be considered completed. Lisk SDK 2.1.0, the beginning of Lisk Alpha SDK phase, is scheduled to be released tomorrow.The soft fork is expected to trigger on August 23, 2019Lisk Core 2.0.0 will introduce a soft fork on the Lisk Network, which will be triggered automatically at block height 10,000,000. We are aware that some work needs to be done by third parties for adjusting their tools to breaking changes (especially API-related) introduced in this release. We decided to extend the time between release and the actual soft fork from 14 days (as announced in our last Development Update) to one month. This should give all node operators enough time to upgrade their nodes. Until this point, it’s safe to run the previous version of Lisk Core (1.6.0), but it’s mandatory to upgrade before August 23, 2019, when we’re expecting the network to reach the soft fork’s height.Lisk SDK will have separate release cycles from Lisk Core for faster implementation of developers’ feedbackFrom now on Lisk SDK and Lisk Core are going to have separate release cycles. It is important to note that not every release of Lisk SDK will be used by Lisk Core and released to the Lisk Network, starting with Lisk SDK 2.1.0. This approach will allow us to address developers’ needs faster, by having closer feedback loops for Lisk SDK, while continuing to work through our Development Roadmap.This release contains several breaking changesLisk Core 2.0.0 contains a few breaking changes, which all node operators should be aware of. The changes are the following:API breaking changes:We removed unconfirmedBalance property from two API endpoints: api/accounts and api/accounts/{address}/multisignature_groups. The node is no longer tracking unconfirmed balances of accounts.Transactions that are not yet included in blocks can have a few different states, according to the actual step of processing. In previous versions, we had unconfirmed, unsigned and unprocessed. With Lisk Core 2.0.0 we have ready, pending, verified, validated and received. This change is affecting the following two API endpoints:api/node/status, which solely lists the number of transactions in each stateapi/node/transactions/{state}, which lists all transactions’ details in a specific stateAPI responses now always return an array of errors, regardless if there was only one error or more. Before it was returning an object for a single error and an array if there was more.The current API documentation for Lisk Core 2.0.0 is already live on our website.Soft fork related changes:Support for dapp registration transactions (type 5) will be dropped, this means that Lisk Core will not accept those transactions anymore, after the soft fork planned on 23 August 2019.Other breaking changes:Logging system changed — logs are now stored in a JSON format for extensible usage and searchability.Configuration files are now defined per module. However, node operators still have the possibility to override them using a custom configuration file (like before, just the structure is different). The guidelines for configuration are available here.Lisk Core 2.0.0 improves transaction processing efficiency and introduces a new P2P libraryThanks to this release, Lisk Network can benefit from two major improvements:Improved transaction processing efficiency was achieved by optimizing the transaction verification and database persistence. Please note, by improved transaction processing efficiency we do not mean transaction throughput which is itself determined by block size and time, but rather improved processing efficiency in terms of computation and resource usage.We have a new P2P library, which includes all technical aspects involved in peer discovery, managing peer connections and message routing. Connections between peers are more stable now.If you are interested in detailed release notes you can find them here: Lisk Core, Lisk SDK.We are also changing our software license from GNU GPL v3.0 to a more permissive Apache 2.0There is one more change affecting both Lisk Core 2.0.0 and Lisk SDK 2.0.0 — we changed the license from GNU General Public License v3.0 to Apache License 2.0. The new license is a more permissive one, for example, the software may be distributed under different terms and without disclosing the source code. You can find more details in the corresponding issues — Lisk SDK and Lisk Core.Lisk is on a mission to enable developers to create decentralized, efficient, and transparent blockchain applications. Join us:NewsletterLisk SDK GitterLisk ResearchLisk.chatTwitterLisk Core 2.0.0 Released on Mainnet, Lisk SDK 2.0.0 Published on NPM & Software License Change was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 07. 23

Lisk Core 2.0.0-rc.0 on Tes...

Hey Liskers,Another month has passed and our development teams have a number of important updates to share with the Lisk community. Here are the main takeaways from June:SDK:The first release candidate of Lisk Core 2.0.0 has been released to Testnet.A number of bugs spotted on Testnet (thank you to community members cc001 and kplusq for spotting) prompted the development of the second release candidate, expected to be released next week.The release of Lisk Core 2.0.0 to Mainnet requires a soft fork with an extended period of 14 days given to node operators to update their nodes.Lisk Core 2.1.0 reached the QA phase and most of the initial features planned for Alpha SDK have been completed.Lisk SDK 2.2.0’s QA has been suspended as we investigate bugs found in Lisk Core 2.0.0 on Testnet — we expect it to resume after the outstanding work on previous releases has been completedLisk SDK 3.0.0 is currently in development. It implements the new secure Byzantine Fault Tolerance consensus which guarantees blocks finality.New P2P features from LIP-0004 have been implemented to improve network security, performance, and allow for an essentially unlimited number of nodes in the network.Lisk Builders:Endro added a delegate contributions featre to LiskDiscovery.Lemii continues his work on ScanBlocks, a tool to calculate passive income from mining and staking. Running custom nodes which can handle SQL queries allows ScanBlocks to produce income reports at speed.SDK Configurator by Moosty is convenient tool to setup and configure attributes for the SDK.We would also like to thank community member Davinet for their ideas on improvements to our Consensus mechanism, read the discussion here.Community member cc001 spotted a bug on Lisk Core 2.0.0’s Testnet.Community member kplsq submitted a Lisk Core 2.0.0 issue to the Bug Bounty Program which the team assigned a medium severity level.UI:The first release candidate of Lisk Hub 1.19.0 was released on Monday. It includes BTC support and finishes wallet’s recent redesign.Lisk Mobile 1.2.0 has been released on Wednesday, it completes the redesign efforts of our mobile wallet.Head of UI Ali showcases some of Mobile’s new transaction processing animations with a short clip.Lisk SDKThe first release candidate of Lisk Core 2.0.0 is on Testnet, second in development after bugs spottedMaciej Baj, Head of Development — Lisk Core 2.0.0-rc.0 is now on Testnet. We are currently working on the next release candidate, as a few new issues were discovered during the open testing phase. Two bugs were identified by community members cc001 and kplusq, with the latter being submitted through the Bug Bounty Program and categorized as a medium severity level. Highly appreciated! Lisk Core 2.0.0-rc.1 is expected to be released to Testnet next week.There was a soft fork planned for this testnet release at height 8,624,442 which triggered automatically when the height was reached by the network, about three days after the release. The soft fork was successful with approximately 80 delegates updating their nodes within the first few hours. We are going to use the same approach for the upcoming mainnet release but the soft fork will be executed about 14 days after — to give node operators enough time to upgrade their nodes.What is a soft fork?Mariusz Serek, Backend Developer — A soft fork happens when a new version of Lisk Core is enforcing more strict rules on blocks or transaction validation. Blocks created by new version clients are backward compatible and are accepted by nodes which are still running older clients, while blocks created using previous version (for example 1.6.0 in this case) are rejected by clients running the new version if they violate the new rules.The 2.0.0 soft fork means that we will we no longer support dapp registration transactionsWe introduced one new rule with this soft fork — we don’t allow to send dapp registration transactions anymore. This type of transaction is not used for anything currently, so maintaining its support in the codebase is too costly.Lisk SDK 2.1.0 reached the QA phase and most of the initial features planned for Alpha SDK have been completedPablo Vicente, Backend Developer — The first round of QA for this version is already completed. We are working on additional test scenarios that will cover custom transactions. As mentioned in the last development update, this release will bring support for creation of custom transactions and improve developer’s experience with our Alpha SDK.Lisk SDK 2.2.0 is currently in the QA phasePablo Vicente, Backend Developer — All of the technical debt related tasks planned for this release are completed and Lisk SDK 2.2.0 is currently in the QA phase. Issues related to block processing have suspended quality assurance for 2.2.0 temporarily. Currently, the development team is focused on fixing the issues spotted after 2.0.0-rc.0 release to testnet. When all required work is done we are going to resume QA for 2.2.0, which you can track the progress on GitHub.Lisk SDK 3.0.0 implements the new secure Byzantine Fault Tolerance consensus which guarantees blocks finalityMehmet Yatki, Backend Developer — The rounds module which was responsible for updating delegates’ vote weights, distributing blocks rewards and transactions’ fees among delegates, will be replaced with newly introduced dpos module. This will allow us to offer developers more flexibility in the future, by providing the possibility to change consensus by replacing just one module.To be able to support rolling back blocks until the finalized height, we had to change the way we calculate the vote weight of delegates. After #3633 is completed vote weight of delegates will be updated immediately after a block is processed. However, transaction fees and block rewards still will be distributed at the end of the round. This change is an implementation detail and won’t affect the behavior of the network.As described in our LIP blog post, the new BFT consensus allows for block finality to be reached after 150 blocks (on average). Having a guarantee that a certain block is final and cannot be rolled back is essential for the future development of blockchain applications on our platform. For instance, when exchanges credit a deposit in LSK tokens, they require a very high degree of certainty that this cannot be undone. You can read the full rationale for our BFT proposal on GitHub.Robust and reliable fork recovery system almost completedIn June, we also worked on implementing the algorithm that determines the finalized height of the blockchain (see: #computing-prevotes-and-precommits).Improved Block Sync Mechanism and newly introduced Fast Chain Switching mechanisms, which together bring a robust and reliable fork recovery system are almost completed. The next step is to integrate them with existing chain module.New P2P features from LIP-0004 have been implementedMitsuaki Uchimoto, Backend Developer — Four features specified by LIP-0004 have been implemented to improve network security, performance and allow for an essentially unlimited number of nodes in the network.Partial view of the network and peer populator:Original peer discovery process tried to discover and connect to all peers in the network. All nodes in the network were connected to each other. With the new protocol (partial mesh), we keep track of a list of known peers. There is an upper limit on the number of allowed inbound and outbound connections per node. We periodically check the list of known peers and connect with them until the maximum number of connections allowed is reached through “peer populator” functionality.White, black & fixed peers lists:Whitelist: Incoming connection from a whitelisted peer is always accepted (if the peer is not blacklisted).Blacklist: If a peer is blacklisted, then no connection can be established with this peer.Fixed: A permanent connection is established to that peer. If the peer is not reachable at the moment, P2P module will keep trying to reconnect.Peer inbound connections eviction mechanism has been implemented for improved security. When the number of allowed inbound connections reaches its maximum limit, we close an existing inbound connection. Some peers will be shielded from this mechanism, based on the following criteria:Netgrouping: We categorize peers into “buckets”, based on the hash of the IP prefix for each eviction candidate. We protect 4 peers with the smallest netgroup values. An attacker cannot predict which netgroups will be protected.Peer latency: We protect a number of peers with optimal latency. An attacker cannot manipulate this metric without physically moving nodes closer to the target.Useful work: We protect peers which perform useful work, such as peers who have recently broadcast blocks or transactions. An attacker cannot manipulate this metric without performing useful work.Connection time: We protect half of the remaining nodes who have been connected for the longest time.Fixed a compatibility issue between nodes version 2.x and nodes running clients older than 1.4.1 version. The P2P library did not account for cases where the peer did not report a protocolVersion.Lisk BuildersRachel Black, Tech Evangelist — Over the last month we have had a number of community contributions to the Lisk ecosystem, including:Endro added delegate contributions to Lisk Discovery. This is an excellent resource to gather insights on delegate contributions, bringing greater transparency to the network, and allowing you to vote for delegates who bring the most value to the ecosystem.Lemii continues his work on ScanBlocks, a tool to calculate passive income from mining and staking. Running custom nodes which can handle SQL queries, allows ScanBlocks to produce income reports at speed.SDK Configurator by Moosty is convenient tool to setup and configure attributes for the SDK.We’ve received a number of important community contributions to the codebase in the past month. Delegate cc001 contributed with the following issue. Along with hosting an online meetup for the Japanese Community, kplusq submitted an issue to the Bug Bounty Program which the team determined with a medium severity level. All details regarding the fix can be viewed here.We would also like to thank community member Davinet for their ideas on improvements to our Consensus mechanism, read the discussion here.Always use third party tools with caution.UILisk Hub 1.19.0 includes BTC support and completes wallet’s recent redesign effortsAli Haghighatkhah, Head of User Interfaces — Lisk Hub Version 1.19.0-beta.1 was released on Monday and brings you two significant improvements. First off, this version includes an integrated BTC token support. Now, users can access their BTC tokens right in Lisk Hub. The support for the most popular and widely used cryptocurrency in the world comes after its implementation in Lisk Mobile 1.0.0 in late April.Another important improvement in Lisk Hub 1.19.0 is the fresh new look. We have started this a few versions back, gradually preparing the project to change from the old design to a modern look that fits our upcoming visual language for the entire Lisk brand. With version 1.19.0 we aim to offer you a minimal, professional look with supportive illustrations and animations.BTC integrationAnother exciting enhancement in Lisk Hub 1.19.0 is the integration of BTC. This enhancement enables users to access their BTC tokens exactly like they do with their LSK tokens. We have tried to keep the same user experience that we had previously introduced in Lisk Mobile. You don’t need another passphrase to store and access your BTC tokens. Keep your existing one safe, it’s now your passphrase to access your BTC tokens as well.Just like in Lisk Mobile, you’ll find a token switcher on the top right corner of the header. Since Lisk Hub runs on a bigger screen size, we have used the space to show your balance right there.As you can see in the above screenshot, there’s a widget called wallet details which shows the balances of each token that you have stored, individually.Lisk Hub shows your bookmarks and recent transactions of your selected token.By clicking on the token switcher, you’ll see a nicely designed menu that allows you to switch between LSK and BTC, access settings, and some other helpful pages.Just like in Lisk Mobile, you can disable the BTC token completely in settings. This removes the BTC interaction from your Lisk Mobile until you re-enable it later.In the wallet page, the transactions of your active token are shown by default. You can see the transactions of the other simply by changing the active token.If you have activated LSK tokens using the token switcher, now you can click on the Send button to send LSK tokens. If you switch the active token to BTC, the send page will change to adapt to BTC specifications. You can choose high or low processing speed. The displayed fee changes according to the amount of tokens you send. This is due to the dynamic nature of BTC network fee.One thing that you might have noticed is that if you change the active token to BTC, the delegates menu item in header disappears. You should consider that delegacy is a specification of Lisk and other blockchains that use DPoS consensus algorithm. Since Bitcoin in designed and built against PoW consensus algorithm, there’s no delegacy and voting concept on that blockchain.Fresh new lookWe have reworked the header to look simpler, easier and with more functionality. We’ve removed the footer allocated the extra space in the header to the network indicator. Since the BTC integration feature is also shipped on this version, you’ll find the token selector right in header. This makes it accessible at all times.Now with the help of precisely selected icons and colors, it easier to recognize if, for example, transaction is ongoing, incoming or from a different type. All titles and descriptions throughout the application are reworked to ensure the maximum readability and an intuitive experience.You can also find your wallet details in a dedicated module in dashboard. It shows the information of your Lisk and Bitcoin accounts in one glance.One of our targets with the new design was to make Lisk Hub and Lisk Mobile have the same visual language, along with the rest of our online presence. These two applications are complementary parts of a single platform and users should not feel different inconsistency moving from one to another.Upgrading to Lisk Hub 1.19.0 you’ll notice new icons, illustrations and animations. We have followed a simplistic method and after designing numerous iterations of each illustration and animation. Next you’ll see two screenshots of those pages.This following screen is the success message you’ll receive after you register as a delegate.And the following screen is what you’ll see when you vote for other delegates.The design changes don’t end here. You’ll find tons of improved elements in the application. Starting with the next version, we’ll only have gradual UX/UI improvements to ensure constant enhancement of your experience. We’ll follow up our user testing rounds to spot and resolve UX/UI issues.Lisk Mobile 1.2.0 is out, completes redesign efforts of our mobile walletAli Haghighatkhah, Head of User Interfaces — Lisk Mobile 1.2.0 was released on July 3. This release’s main purpose is to migrate our existing user experience to the new design that matches the new Lisk branding language. The new design with the changes in Lisk Hub mentioned above. This ensures a unified user experience for both of our user-facing products.Fresh new lookLet’s start with the views which a new user starts with. In the past we had simple written titles explaining situations when the account doesn’t have transactions, bookmarks and so on. But we think the first pages make the best first impression. So they are as important as other pages. Hence, we have crafted gorgeous illustrations to fill in the empty spaces.Colors are chosen carefully to look good in dark mode too.We’d like to use this opportunity to remind you to initialize your account with your first outgoing transaction as soon as your receive your first tokens.We’ve experienced a wide range of colors to conclude with a color pallet that looks great though out the application and works just as nice in dark mode.While implementing the new design we took the chance to improve the code quality of our React components, improved some transitional animations, and enhanced the performance in some screens. Considering all the improvements, we hope you’ll have a more pleasant experience using Lisk Mobile 1.2.0.Example 1: New animation to help new users easily understand when their transaction is validatedAnother UX issue that we fixed with this version was the animation that is played after you send a transaction. The old animation was not easily understood and was confusing to some users due to the few seconds it takes for a transaction to be validated. We studied this and tested various scenarios which led us to create an animation which helps users easily understand when exactly their transaction is validated. The first step of the animation indicates that your transaction has been submitted to the blockchain. Next, it waits for the first confirmation. At this time, a network animation is looping. Shortly after, the transaction is confirmed, a beautiful animation is played that demonstrates LSK arriving to its destination address.Example 2: New BTC data fetching animation to indicate that the page will load shortlySince after integration of BTC we need to extract both BTC and LSK addresses when users sign in, and since this is a heavy process for mobile devices, in the previous version signing in used to take a long time, keeping users waiting. And this wasn’t clearly communicated with the users through the application. One of the enhancements in Lisk Mobile 1.2.0 was that we split this job in two pages, allowing an animation that indicates the data is being fetched to cover the time required. We also enhanced the sign-in buttons to state this more clearly to the users.Thanks for keeping up with the latest developments here at Lisk. The next month will see us progress further through various objectives on the roadmap as well as produce multiple releases across our product suite.Lisk Development TeamsLisk empowers individuals to create a more decentralized, efficient and transparent global economy. We welcome you to join us in our mission:NewsletterLisk SDK GitterLisk ResearchLisk.chatRedditTwitterLisk Core 2.0.0-rc.0 on Testnet, Hub 1.19.0’s BTC Support & UI Redesign Completed was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 07. 04

Everything you need to know...

We have moved the LIP discussion to Lisk Research starting today. Lisk Research is supported by Discourse, a long-form discussion platform and enhances the debate with a much more inclusive and intuitive user experience. The existing discussion on the Mailing List has been moved to the new platform and the mailing list will remain in a read-only state.Lisk Improvement Proposals (LIPs) provide the scientific backbone to the development of the Lisk network. Introduced in late 2018, LIPs form a proposal system which allows transparent and open discussion on how the Lisk network is being built. The current LIP process allows us to gather feedback on proposals on how to tackle roadmap objectives and much more. The proposals can be submitted by anyone, provided that they correctly follow our official guidelines. In the true spirit of the open-source ethos however, it is as important for us to gather feedback about roadmap objectives as it is about the LIP process itself. We are very happy to announce that after receiving community feedback, we are discontinuing the LIP mailing list and introducing a new platform for discussion, Lisk Research. As of today, the existing discussion on the old platform has been moved to the new platform and the mailing list will remain in a read-only state, with all new submissions receiving an e-mail about the new platform.Lisk Research ensures an inclusive and user-friendly LIP experience.Lisk Research is supported by Discourse, an open-source platform which provides forums for long-form discussion. The introduction of the new landing page makes participating in the LIP process much more accessible. Apart from the obvious benefits of a much cleaner and user-friendly interface, there are a few main reasons for why this particular platform will help community members participating in the LIP process. Firstly, it supports two distinct typesetting systems, LaTeX and Markdown. These, along with visual features such as Graphviz diagram support, allow all LIP champions and discussion participants to include compelling and educational infographics to support their proposals.Extended visual options allow LIP Champions a more compelling medium for their proposals.The handy categorization system allows all proposals and discussions to be organized by themes such as Transactions, Cryptography, Economics and so on.Discussions are now neatly organized and easy to follow.There are also several features which allow the moderators to manage topics and posts, while at the same time providing full transparency to the reader about all changes have been made and why. Lastly, Lisk Research allows the users to only follow specific topics or categories that they are most interested in. In this way, Lisk Research’s users can customize what notifications they receive.Switching to Lisk Research is all about inclusion.The decision to switch to the Discourse platform had two main foundations. On one side, we received significant feedback from community members which implied the Mailing List is not the most inclusive and seamless experience for ensuring LIP participation. Secondly, we realized that while the mailing list is an industry standard for improvement proposals for other major networks such as Bitcoin, we can enhance and streamline the debate by changing to a more modern user interface of Discourse.The LIP Process will still apply to Lisk Research.The LIP Process is designed to strike a fine balance between the inclusion of valuable community opinions and continuing to reach the objectives of our development roadmap in a timely manner. Introduction of Lisk Research is meant to help all LIP champions participate in the debate, both by submitting their own proposals and giving feedback on the existing documents. The rules of discussion remain as follows — Lightcurve DevOps are the administrators of Lisk Research, while Lightcurve Scientists are its moderators. The latter will be moderating the content in the spirit of keeping the conversation within guidelines and centering around the technical and scientific development of the Lisk network. More information on posting can be found here and on the LIP process here. We hope that the switch to Lisk Research will allow more community members to get a clearer insight, or even contribute to, the ongoing scientific debate. Let’s build the future, together!The Lisk FoundationCheck out Lisk Research and get involved in the debate today.Everything you need to know about Lisk Research was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 03. 20

Benedikt Schuppli Joins the...

We want to welcome Benedikt Schuppli to the board of the Lisk Foundation. With a professional career at the intersection of law and blockchain, as well as a history of freelance legal work for Lisk, Benedikt has joined the Foundation’s board at the beginning of the new year.Benedikt brings substantial experience in law, banking, blockchain and much more.Benedikt has worked in a variety of thriving industries. He has finished his Masters in Law at the University of Zurich. Shortly after, he was admitted to the Bar as an attorney. His professional experience spans multiple sectors, ranging from Swiss private banks to public administration. In recent years, Benedikt focused primarily on the nascent blockchain industry. He was the Chief Legal Officer for Lykke, a Swiss-based cryptocurrency exchange. He also advised a number of successful blockchain startups on legal and regulatory matters. Furthermore, he’s authored papers on smart contracts and on blockchain and the law, as well as spoke on the topic at industry events including Blockchain Live in London. Currently, aside from contributing to the Lisk ecosystem as its board member, Benedikt has co-founded a project developing a smart contract programming language for lawyers.He has been involved with Lisk since the early days.Apart from his industry expertise, Benedikt brings with him an in-depth knowledge of the Lisk ecosystem. Benedikt was an early community member and adopter of the LSK token. He has started to contribute professionally to Lisk as early as 2017 as its freelance legal advisor.He will help the Foundation’s board in regulatory and strategic matters.Benedikt will use his experience in and knowledge of Lisk to help the Foundation oversee regulatory matters as well as provide strategic advice. As an early blockchain enthusiast and believer, his personal goal is also to ensure “the spirit of decentralization” remains in the project.Benedikt’s joining follows the departure of Pascal Schmid from the board, due to the Foundation’s parting of ways with Sielva Management SA.We want to give him a warm welcome to the Lisk Foundation and are looking forward to the great work we will do together.The Lisk FoundationBenedikt Schuppli Joins the Lisk Foundation’s Board was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 02. 18

Benedikt Schuppli Joins the...

We want to welcome Benedikt Schuppli to the board of the Lisk Foundation. With a professional career at the intersection of law and blockchain, as well as a history of freelance legal work for Lisk, Benedikt has joined the Foundation’s board at the beginning of the new year.Benedikt brings substantial experience in law, banking, blockchain and much more.Benedikt has worked in a variety of thriving industries. He has finished his Masters in Law at the University of Zurich. Shortly after, he was admitted to the Bar as an attorney. His professional experience spans multiple sectors, ranging from Swiss private banks to public administration. In recent years, Benedikt focused primarily on the nascent blockchain industry. He was the Chief Legal Officer for Lykke, a Swiss-based cryptocurrency exchange. He also advised a number of successful blockchain startups on legal and regulatory matters. Furthermore, he’s authored papers on smart contracts and on blockchain and the law, as well as spoke on the topic at industry events including Blockchain Live in London. Currently, aside from contributing to the Lisk ecosystem as its board member, Benedikt has co-founded a project developing a smart contract programming language for lawyers.He has been involved with Lisk since the early days.Apart from his industry expertise, Benedikt brings with him an in-depth knowledge of the Lisk ecosystem. Benedikt was an early community member and adopter of the LSK token. He has started to contribute professionally to Lisk as early as 2017 as its freelance legal advisor.He will help the Foundation’s board in regulatory and strategic matters.Benedikt will use his experience in and knowledge of Lisk to help the Foundation oversee regulatory matters as well as provide strategic advice. As an early blockchain enthusiast and believer, his personal goal is also to ensure “the spirit of decentralization” remains in the project.Benedikt’s joining follows the departure of Pascal Schmid from the board, due to the Foundation’s parting of ways with Sielva Management SA.We want to give him a warm welcome to the Lisk Foundation and are looking forward to the great work we will do together.The Lisk FoundationBenedikt Schuppli Joins the Lisk Foundation’s Board was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 02. 18

LiskDevUpdate: Core 1.5.0 i...

Lisk Dev Update: Core 1.5.0 in QA Testing, Hub’s Ledger Nano Integration and more!Hi Liskers,January is nearly over and Lightcurve development teams have a number of new releases already out and in the pipeline. Lisk Core 1.5.0 is nearing a release to Testnet and implements an extensible data persistence model, as well as other Roadmap objectives. Lisk Elements continues work on three libraries and integration into Lisk Core with 2.1.0. New Lisk Hub 1.9.0 release includes beta integration for Ledger Nano. Upcoming Lisk Mobile 0.10.0 features an iMessage extension, 3D touch, and German localization! Want to know more? Read on.Lisk CoreLisk Core 1.5.0 implements an extensible data persistence model1.5.0’s development phase is over and the release is currently in the Quality Assurance Testing (QA Testing) stage. Provided that no major regressions are spotted during QA testing, we expect to release Lisk Core 1.5.0 to Testnet early next week. This release will complete two objectives from Lisk’s development roadmap’s ‘Architecture and Design’ phase. These are:‘Use a consistent and informative versioning scheme’‘Implement extensible data persistence model’ which is a prerequisite requirement for implementing LIP-0005 (find out more about Lisk Improvement Proposals here).Lisk Core 1.6.0 will finalize the last stages of the new system architecture LIP1.6.0’s development started this week. This release will implement the second and last stage of the most significant objective of the Architecture and Design phase:‘Introduce a new flexible, resilient and modular architecture for Lisk Core’You can track the progress of this objective’s implementation on GitHub. The completion of the Architecture and Design phase consolidates the Lisk Modular repository into Lisk Core and sets the structure for the new modular architecture, by initially extracting two modules — “chain” and “http-api”. Several components scheduled for 1.5.0 were moved to 1.6.0 in order to prevent scope creep.The Architecture and Design phase is set to be fully implemented in the next three releases — 1.5.0, 1.6.0 and 1.7.0This excludes an urgent need for a patch release. The milestones explaining the implementation details of the last two objectives of the current roadmap phase will be included in the 1.7.0 release. These are:Implement design pattern for protocol change (LIP is currently in research)Improve transaction processing efficiencyWork for part of this release has already started on feature branches.Lisk ElementsLisk Elements 2.1.0 includes work on three libraries and continues integration with Core2.1.0’s development is finished. With this release, we have implemented features for the following libraries:Transaction extends the functionality for Core to be able to process transactions and lays down the basis of custom transactions for the future SDKTransaction-pool where transactions are held prior to being written to the blockP2P lays down the basis for LIP-0004 by creating the initial version of the library that is compatible with the current CoreWe are currently focusing on QA testing and refining these libraries. Moreover, using the created transaction and transaction-pool, we have started to work on the roadmap objective “Improve transaction processing efficiency” in Lisk Core. Once the QA testing is concluded, we will start to integrate the P2P library into Lisk Core. This is part of our long term strategy to incrementally increase the usage of Lisk Elements inside of Core, resulting in cleaner code, with functionality defined in one location.Lisk HubLisk Hub 1.9.0 now supports Ledger Nano Hardware integration in BETA1.9.0 was released on January 23 and includes the new Ledger Nano hardware wallet support. Ledger Nano support is introduced with the Beta label, which means there is still more testing and improvements to be made. The integration currently allows Windows and MacOS to use multiple accounts on Ledger Nano to receive and send LSK tokens as well as vote for delegates. Linux support will be added after 1.9.0. We encourage the community to try it out with Testnet and send us any feedback. Please be aware the Beta label has no impact on the security of the connection with the wallet.We would like to thank our community members Hirish and Vekexasia for their contributions to the Ledger Nano hardware wallet. For help with setting up your Ledger Nano to Lisk Hub, check out our Tech Evangelist Rachel’s walkthrough on Twitter:Please note that Hub 1.9.0 requires the latest Ledger Nano Firmware version 1.5.5.Please opt-in to share your Lisk Hub usage analytics with usIn order to improve the user experience of Lisk Hub we need to get more insights about its usage. At the same time, we care deeply about the privacy of our users. Because of the need to include user feedback, Lisk Hub 1.9.0 comes with the optional usage statistics analytics tool, Matomo. We kindly ask our community members to help us improve Lisk Hub by:Going to the Settings pageEnabling the “Send anonymous usage statistics” toggleIf enabled, the usage data such as buttons clicked or pages visited is gathered to a LiskHQ-hosted instance of Matomo. This ensures that no third party has access to your data.To opt-in, click on ‘Send anonymous usage statistics’ in ‘Advanced features’Lisk Hub 1.10.0 introduces our improved UI, showcasing months of research, design and user testing1.10.0’s feature development is finished. This ships with an entirely redesigned splash screen, login page, and registration process as well as menu navigation and bottom status bar.In Lisk Hub 1.11.0, you can look forward to further integrations of our new UX and UI1.11.0 is currently in development. We are working on design updates to further pages. More information regarding the upcoming features will be included in the next LiskDevUpdate.Lisk MobileLisk Mobile 0.10.0 will enable 3D Touch, sending LSK via iMessage and German localization 🇩🇪0.10.0 is close to being finalized, with the majority of the issues already resolved. This version brings with it a number of new features, including the 3D Touch shortcuts menu, which appears when you hold down the app icon for an extended period of time. The shortcut allows you to directly open the mobile wallet’s most used pages, which are the send and request pages (in our case). 3D Touch will be available on both Android and iOS.You will also be able to request tokens via an iMessage extension, which is a feature specific to iOS. If you own an iOS device, you can open iMessage directly and request tokens from your contacts, who can then decide to send or reject your request.Lastly, we’ve added German localization to the Lisk Mobile wallet, so the app will also be available to use auf Deutsch. There are multiple reasons for integrating this language option. One of these reasons takes into account our existing user-base and Germany ranks in the top three for all countries. For business development and developer adoption, Germany is a top market. According to the 2018 StackOverflow Developer Survey, Germany now has the largest professional developer population in Europe, overtaking the UK. In addition, Germany is ranked 2nd for its volume of Bitcoin nodes, making it prime territory for reaching blockchain early adopters.Lisk ExplorerLisk Explorer 2.2.2 will include UI fixes for desktop and mobile2.2.2’s development is currently ongoing and close to completion. It contains some UI fixes for both regular screen and smaller mobile resolutions. The update of package dependencies and a feature to display a warning when Explorer goes offline is also included.Thanks for keeping up with the latest developments here at Lightcurve. The next two weeks will see us progress further through the Architecture and Design phase of our development roadmap, as well as produce multiple releases across our product suite.Lightcurve Development TeamLisk empowers individuals to create a more decentralized, efficient and transparent global economy. We welcome you to join us in our mission.LIPs mailing listLisk.chatRedditTwitterDisclaimer: We’ve changed Lisk Mobile’s ‘iMessage plugin’ to ‘iMessage extension’ to accurately describe the new feature.Disclaimer 1: We’ve added Ledger’s Nano firmware link under Hub 1.9.0.LiskDevUpdate: Core 1.5.0 in QA, Hub’s Ledger Nano Integration and more! was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 01. 31

LiskDevUpdate: Core 1.5.0 i...

Lisk Dev Update: Core 1.5.0 in QA Testing, Hub’s Ledger Nano Integration and more!Hi Liskers,January is nearly over and Lightcurve development teams have a number of new releases already out and in the pipeline. Lisk Core 1.5.0 is nearing a release to Testnet and implements an extensible data persistence model, as well as other Roadmap objectives. Lisk Elements continues work on three libraries and integration into Lisk Core with 2.1.0. New Lisk Hub 1.9.0 release includes beta integration for Ledger Nano. Upcoming Lisk Mobile 0.10.0 features an iMessage extension, 3D touch, and German localization! Want to know more? Read on.Lisk CoreLisk Core 1.5.0 implements an extensible data persistence model1.5.0’s development phase is over and the release is currently in the Quality Assurance Testing (QA Testing) stage. Provided that no major regressions are spotted during QA testing, we expect to release Lisk Core 1.5.0 to Testnet early next week. This release will complete two objectives from Lisk’s development roadmap’s ‘Architecture and Design’ phase. These are:‘Use a consistent and informative versioning scheme’‘Implement extensible data persistence model’ which is a prerequisite requirement for implementing LIP-0005 (find out more about Lisk Improvement Proposals here).Lisk Core 1.6.0 will finalize the last stages of the new system architecture LIP1.6.0’s development started this week. This release will implement the second and last stage of the most significant objective of the Architecture and Design phase:‘Introduce a new flexible, resilient and modular architecture for Lisk Core’You can track the progress of this objective’s implementation on GitHub. The completion of the Architecture and Design phase consolidates the Lisk Modular repository into Lisk Core and sets the structure for the new modular architecture, by initially extracting two modules — “chain” and “http-api”. Several components scheduled for 1.5.0 were moved to 1.6.0 in order to prevent scope creep.The Architecture and Design phase is set to be fully implemented in the next three releases — 1.5.0, 1.6.0 and 1.7.0This excludes an urgent need for a patch release. The milestones explaining the implementation details of the last two objectives of the current roadmap phase will be included in the 1.7.0 release. These are:Implement design pattern for protocol change (LIP is currently in research)Improve transaction processing efficiencyWork for part of this release has already started on feature branches.Lisk ElementsLisk Elements 2.1.0 includes work on three libraries and continues integration with Core2.1.0’s development is finished. With this release, we have implemented features for the following libraries:Transaction extends the functionality for Core to be able to process transactions and lays down the basis of custom transactions for the future SDKTransaction-pool where transactions are held prior to being written to the blockP2P lays down the basis for LIP-0004 by creating the initial version of the library that is compatible with the current CoreWe are currently focusing on QA testing and refining these libraries. Moreover, using the created transaction and transaction-pool, we have started to work on the roadmap objective “Improve transaction processing efficiency” in Lisk Core. Once the QA testing is concluded, we will start to integrate the P2P library into Lisk Core. This is part of our long term strategy to incrementally increase the usage of Lisk Elements inside of Core, resulting in cleaner code, with functionality defined in one location.Lisk HubLisk Hub 1.9.0 now supports Ledger Nano Hardware integration in BETA1.9.0 was released on January 23 and includes the new Ledger Nano hardware wallet support. Ledger Nano support is introduced with the Beta label, which means there is still more testing and improvements to be made. The integration currently allows Windows and MacOS to use multiple accounts on Ledger Nano to receive and send LSK tokens as well as vote for delegates. Linux support will be added after 1.9.0. We encourage the community to try it out with Testnet and send us any feedback. Please be aware the Beta label has no impact on the security of the connection with the wallet.We would like to thank our community members Hirish and Vekexasia for their contributions to the Ledger Nano hardware wallet. For help with setting up your Ledger Nano to Lisk Hub, check out our Tech Evangelist Rachel’s walkthrough on Twitter:Please note that Hub 1.9.0 requires the latest Ledger Nano Firmware version 1.5.5.Please opt-in to share your Lisk Hub usage analytics with usIn order to improve the user experience of Lisk Hub we need to get more insights about its usage. At the same time, we care deeply about the privacy of our users. Because of the need to include user feedback, Lisk Hub 1.9.0 comes with the optional usage statistics analytics tool, Matomo. We kindly ask our community members to help us improve Lisk Hub by:Going to the Settings pageEnabling the “Send anonymous usage statistics” toggleIf enabled, the usage data such as buttons clicked or pages visited is gathered to a LiskHQ-hosted instance of Matomo. This ensures that no third party has access to your data.To opt-in, click on ‘Send anonymous usage statistics’ in ‘Advanced features’Lisk Hub 1.10.0 introduces our improved UI, showcasing months of research, design and user testing1.10.0’s feature development is finished. This ships with an entirely redesigned splash screen, login page, and registration process as well as menu navigation and bottom status bar.In Lisk Hub 1.11.0, you can look forward to further integrations of our new UX and UI1.11.0 is currently in development. We are working on design updates to further pages. More information regarding the upcoming features will be included in the next LiskDevUpdate.Lisk MobileLisk Mobile 0.10.0 will enable 3D Touch, sending LSK via iMessage and German localization 🇩🇪0.10.0 is close to being finalized, with the majority of the issues already resolved. This version brings with it a number of new features, including the 3D Touch shortcuts menu, which appears when you hold down the app icon for an extended period of time. The shortcut allows you to directly open the mobile wallet’s most used pages, which are the send and request pages (in our case). 3D Touch will be available on both Android and iOS.You will also be able to request tokens via an iMessage extension, which is a feature specific to iOS. If you own an iOS device, you can open iMessage directly and request tokens from your contacts, who can then decide to send or reject your request.Lastly, we’ve added German localization to the Lisk Mobile wallet, so the app will also be available to use auf Deutsch. There are multiple reasons for integrating this language option. One of these reasons takes into account our existing user-base and Germany ranks in the top three for all countries. For business development and developer adoption, Germany is a top market. According to the 2018 StackOverflow Developer Survey, Germany now has the largest professional developer population in Europe, overtaking the UK. In addition, Germany is ranked 2nd for its volume of Bitcoin nodes, making it prime territory for reaching blockchain early adopters.Lisk ExplorerLisk Explorer 2.2.2 will include UI fixes for desktop and mobile2.2.2’s development is currently ongoing and close to completion. It contains some UI fixes for both regular screen and smaller mobile resolutions. The update of package dependencies and a feature to display a warning when Explorer goes offline is also included.Thanks for keeping up with the latest developments here at Lightcurve. The next two weeks will see us progress further through the Architecture and Design phase of our development roadmap, as well as produce multiple releases across our product suite.Lightcurve Development TeamLisk empowers individuals to create a more decentralized, efficient and transparent global economy. We welcome you to join us in our mission.LIPs mailing listLisk.chatRedditTwitterDisclaimer: We’ve changed Lisk Mobile’s ‘iMessage plugin’ to ‘iMessage extension’ to accurately describe the new feature.Disclaimer 1: We’ve added Ledger’s Nano firmware link under Hub 1.9.0.LiskDevUpdate: Core 1.5.0 in QA, Hub’s Ledger Nano Integration and more! was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 01. 31

Guido Schmitz-Krummacher Jo...

Max, Oliver and GuidoWe want to welcome back Guido Schmitz-Krummacher to the Lisk Foundation. Having previously sat on the Foundation Council as a Board Member, Guido joins the office in Zug, Switzerland as its Managing Director, alongside two other experienced hires.The RoleGuido’s will be responsible for maintaining and developing all aspects of the Lisk Foundation. His primary focus will be its administrative, legal and financial wellbeing. With the expansion of the Zug office, Guido will oversee sourcing top talent to join him in supervising the activity of our office.He will use his international law background and Swiss regulatory system knowledge to make sure Lisk makes full use of Crypto Valley’s ecosystem. Guido will also be responsible for compiling regular reports and presenting his work’s results to the Foundation Council.The ExperienceGuido has previously worked in international humanitarian aid and executive positions in the financial, chemical and startup sectors. The latest chapter of his career has seen him focus on driving the global adoption of serious blockchain projects. His motto is ‘nothing is impossible,’ and he takes it very seriously in his work.Zug Office ExpandsTwo new hires have also joined Guido in our Zug office. Marcin Zarakowski is joining as the Legal Counsel. He will drive progress in compliance, corporate issues, and management of intellectual property. Camelia Ionela Mikesch has joined as the Foundation’s Accounting Manager and will help oversee its finances.Marcin, Guido and CameliaWith deep links to Lisk, as well as considerable contributions to a variety of significant blockchain projects based in the Crypto Valley, Guido is convinced of Lisk’s place as the top ecosystem for blockchain apps. We are happy to see him join the Foundation alongside Marcin and Camelia and look forward to benefiting from their diverse skill set and experience.The Lisk FoundationWant to know more? Follow us on Twitter or join the conversation on Lisk.Chat.Guido Schmitz-Krummacher Joins the Lisk Foundation as Managing Director, Alongside Two Extra Hires was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 01. 23

Guido Schmitz-Krummacher Jo...

Max, Oliver and GuidoWe want to welcome back Guido Schmitz-Krummacher to the Lisk Foundation. Having previously sat on the Foundation Council as a Board Member, Guido joins the office in Zug, Switzerland as its Managing Director, alongside two other experienced hires.The RoleGuido’s will be responsible for maintaining and developing all aspects of the Lisk Foundation. His primary focus will be its administrative, legal and financial wellbeing. With the expansion of the Zug office, Guido will oversee sourcing top talent to join him in supervising the activity of our office.He will use his international law background and Swiss regulatory system knowledge to make sure Lisk makes full use of Crypto Valley’s ecosystem. Guido will also be responsible for compiling regular reports and presenting his work’s results to the Foundation Council.The ExperienceGuido has previously worked in international humanitarian aid and executive positions in the financial, chemical and startup sectors. The latest chapter of his career has seen him focus on driving the global adoption of serious blockchain projects. His motto is ‘nothing is impossible,’ and he takes it very seriously in his work.Zug Office ExpandsTwo new hires have also joined Guido in our Zug office. Marcin Zarakowski is joining as the Legal Counsel. He will drive progress in compliance, corporate issues, and management of intellectual property. Camelia Ionela Mikesch has joined as the Foundation’s Accounting Manager and will help oversee its finances.Marcin, Guido and CameliaWith deep links to Lisk, as well as considerable contributions to a variety of significant blockchain projects based in the Crypto Valley, Guido is convinced of Lisk’s place as the top ecosystem for blockchain apps. We are happy to see him join the Foundation alongside Marcin and Camelia and look forward to benefiting from their diverse skill set and experience.The Lisk FoundationWant to know more? Follow us on Twitter or join the conversation on Lisk.Chat.Guido Schmitz-Krummacher Joins the Lisk Foundation as Managing Director, Alongside Two Extra Hires was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 01. 23

Development Update — Decemb...

Development Update — December 13, 2018Hi Liskers,The holidays are fast approaching — that doesn’t stop Lightcurve development teams from making headway across our suite of our products. We have released Lisk Core 1.3.1, Elements 2.0.0 and Hub 1.7.0. Check out the full rundown below.Lisk Core1.3.1 was released on December 5 in order to implement a security update from Node.js to v8.14.0 and SocketCluster to v14.3.3. Remaining node operators should upgrade if they haven’t already.1.4.0’s development is finished, and the QA Phase has begun. This release fulfills the last objective from the current Lisk Network Roadmap phase, “Quality & Performance”, and moves the build system directly into Lisk Core. It also tackles a large chunk of the backlog and closes 44 issues.1.5.0 will contain the first batch of changes from the next roadmap phase, “Architecture & Design.” Work on this phase has already begun, and the first pull request setting the fundamentals of the new Extensible Database Layer has been merged. It contains the basic structure of the database layer, and also contains a reference implementation of CRUD operations for the Account entity. This introduces new BaseEntity class which contains common methods available to entities that are extending it. The BaseEntity class also contains the blueprint of the methods that the subclass is required to implement hence acting as an interface. Another concept introduced by this pull request was Adapters which will allow to easily change the database solution if required.For now, the initial work on the Extensible Database Layer will be done on a separate feature branch. It will be merged back to development after all of the new Database Entities will be implemented and securely replaced within the existing codebase.Lisk Elements2.0.0 was released on December 3. This release brings with it an upgrade to Node.js v8, bringing Elements in line with Core. It also includes the addition of Sodium Native support for faster performance for cryptography-related functionalities. Benchmarks on sodium-native vs. TweetNaCl can be found in our documentation.2.1.0 is currently in development. As part of the “Improve transaction processing efficiency” roadmap objective, work on the transaction pool continued at a good pace, with a number of important issues being closed for this milestone.Work on the “Introduce robust peer selection and banning mechanism” objective continued with all the main methods which will be exported to the peer-to-peer library being declared, along with all relevant TypeScript definitions. The basic scaffolding for the peer-to-peer library’s test suite has been set up.Lisk Commander2.1.0’s major change, namely the migration of Lisk Commander to TypeScript, is expected to finish next week. Moreover, improvements have been made to the ‘transaction:get’ command, which includes pulling transactions by state unprocessed or unsigned and senderId. We have also created a new command to get all the voters for a delegate by typing ‘delegate:voters’. In addition, extra filtering functionality has been made to both of these commands.Lisk Hub1.7.0 was released on December 12. This release brings a number of updates to the overall look, noticeably the background has been changed to a lighter gray, with other elements adjusted to match. In addition, we have added a feedback button to the sidebar — you can now help steer the direction of Hub’s development directly from within the app!Lisk Mobile0.7.0 is currently awaiting approval in the App and Google stores and should be released shortly. This release brings with it a redesigned home page, a bookmark page, links to other accounts’ overviews when clicking on the address, UI improvements for smaller screens, and a progress bar on the send page.This is the last LiskDevUpdate for 2018. We’ll be back on January 17 and can’t wait to share with you all the exciting developments 2019 will bring.The Lisk TeamDevelopment Update — December 13, 2018 was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 12. 13

Development Update — Decemb...

Development Update — December 13, 2018Hi Liskers,The holidays are fast approaching — that doesn’t stop Lightcurve development teams from making headway across our suite of our products. We have released Lisk Core 1.3.1, Elements 2.0.0 and Hub 1.7.0. Check out the full rundown below.Lisk Core1.3.1 was released on December 5 in order to implement a security update from Node.js to v8.14.0 and SocketCluster to v14.3.3. Remaining node operators should upgrade if they haven’t already.1.4.0’s development is finished, and the QA Phase has begun. This release fulfills the last objective from the current Lisk Network Roadmap phase, “Quality & Performance”, and moves the build system directly into Lisk Core. It also tackles a large chunk of the backlog and closes 44 issues.1.5.0 will contain the first batch of changes from the next roadmap phase, “Architecture & Design.” Work on this phase has already begun, and the first pull request setting the fundamentals of the new Extensible Database Layer has been merged. It contains the basic structure of the database layer, and also contains a reference implementation of CRUD operations for the Account entity. This introduces new BaseEntity class which contains common methods available to entities that are extending it. The BaseEntity class also contains the blueprint of the methods that the subclass is required to implement hence acting as an interface. Another concept introduced by this pull request was Adapters which will allow to easily change the database solution if required.For now, the initial work on the Extensible Database Layer will be done on a separate feature branch. It will be merged back to development after all of the new Database Entities will be implemented and securely replaced within the existing codebase.Lisk Elements2.0.0 was released on December 3. This release brings with it an upgrade to Node.js v8, bringing Elements in line with Core. It also includes the addition of Sodium Native support for faster performance for cryptography-related functionalities. Benchmarks on sodium-native vs. TweetNaCl can be found in our documentation.2.1.0 is currently in development. As part of the “Improve transaction processing efficiency” roadmap objective, work on the transaction pool continued at a good pace, with a number of important issues being closed for this milestone.Work on the “Introduce robust peer selection and banning mechanism” objective continued with all the main methods which will be exported to the peer-to-peer library being declared, along with all relevant TypeScript definitions. The basic scaffolding for the peer-to-peer library’s test suite has been set up.Lisk Commander2.1.0’s major change, namely the migration of Lisk Commander to TypeScript, is expected to finish next week. Moreover, improvements have been made to the ‘transaction:get’ command, which includes pulling transactions by state unprocessed or unsigned and senderId. We have also created a new command to get all the voters for a delegate by typing ‘delegate:voters’. In addition, extra filtering functionality has been made to both of these commands.Lisk Hub1.7.0 was released on December 12. This release brings a number of updates to the overall look, noticeably the background has been changed to a lighter gray, with other elements adjusted to match. In addition, we have added a feedback button to the sidebar — you can now help steer the direction of Hub’s development directly from within the app!Lisk Mobile0.7.0 is currently awaiting approval in the App and Google stores and should be released shortly. This release brings with it a redesigned home page, a bookmark page, links to other accounts’ overviews when clicking on the address, UI improvements for smaller screens, and a progress bar on the send page.This is the last LiskDevUpdate for 2018. We’ll be back on January 17 and can’t wait to share with you all the exciting developments 2019 will bring.The Lisk TeamDevelopment Update — December 13, 2018 was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 12. 13

Development Update — Novemb...

Development Update — November 29, 2018Hi Liskers,As usual, it’s been a busy couple of weeks for Lightcurve Development teams. Aside from the unveiling of our Development Roadmap and the opening of the Lisk Improvement Proposal process, development work has continued uninterrupted. We have released Lisk Core 1.3.0, Elements 1.1.3, Mobile 0.6.0 and Explorer 2.1.8. Check out the full rundown below.Lisk Core1.3.0 was released to Mainnet as planned on November 19. 1.3.0 gives node operators the option to use New Relic as a service to monitor node performance. This will be useful for all network stakeholders — delegates, exchanges as well as Lightcurve’s development teams. We have created a dedicated repository for this integration, which will provide you with all the information you need to start experimenting with Lisk Core and New Relic (use of New Relic is strictly optional, of course).1.4.0’s development phase ends soon, with only two issues left to review before it moves to the QA phase. As 1.4.0 already fixes several bugs and contains many improvements, we decided not to include any objectives from the new roadmap. Instead, these objectives will be included in releases following 1.4.0. The documentation of 1.4.0 will also have to be updated, as the whole ‘lisk-build’ repository is now consolidated into ‘lisk’. You can expect a PR in the ‘lisk-docs’ repository soon. In the meantime, work on the objectives stated by the roadmap has already begun — keep an eye and track the progress of ‘Introduce new flexible, resilient and modular architecture’ together with a great Database Layer refactor by checking out the following milestone.Lisk Improvement Proposals will help to enrich our network’s development into a diverse and robust blockchain application platform. We will report on their implementation on GitHub and in DevUpdates with each LIP having corresponding milestones. The ‘Projects’ section of our GitHub will reflect the content of releases and consist of issues being part of backlog and milestones. Please read carefully how we intend to notify the community about breaking changes in this dedicated LIP.We’ve opened two new milestones, which are the implementation equivalents of LIPs. These are named “Consistent and informative versioning scheme” and “Introduce new flexible, resilient and modular architecture — Phase 1” (also described as ‘Application Architecture’ here). Application Architecture will consist of three phases in total, each of them contained in a separate milestone. The next Lisk Core release, 1.5.0, will contain the first phase of Application Architecture and pressing issues from the backlog.Several issues opened by community members discussing the protocol changes to Lisk Core had been closed. We highly encourage the community to provide the review following the LIPs processes as described in the guidelines and keep the separation between the Lisk Core implementation discussed on the repository.Lisk Commander2.1.0 is currently in development. It will include features such as being able to get information from the transaction pool, as well as enabling data field when creating transfer transactions. 2.1.0 will also introduce commands to get voters and vote information from the blockchain, as well as more flexibility to fetch transactions from the blockchain.Lisk Elements1.1.3 was released as a patch in order to fix an issue dealing with a runtime problem in the non-babel environment. Please make sure you are using this version in development.2.0.0 is currently in development and will be released as a release candidate next week. It will include a more detailed error message for API errors, an upgrade to Node 8.10, stricter validation when creating transactions, as well as support for sodium-native. It also will include our optional migration to TypeScript migration — read more about this here.2.1.0 is also currently in development. It contains milestones from LIPs “Improve transaction processing efficiency” and “Introduce robust peer selection and banning mechanism”.Lisk Hub1.7.0 is currently in development. Its features will include implementing a bright background design, giving it more of a desktop look. 1.7.0 will also add a feedback link to the sidebar, which opens up more opportunities for community feedback about our network dashboard’s development. This particular version has also seen a finalized unit test migration to Jest, as well removing of Mocha and Karma. Tests are now 2–3 times faster and easier to debug.Lisk Mobile0.6.0 was released and includes a variety of new features. These include a new design of the send screen, which breaks the interface into several pages and introduces bookmarked accounts. We’ve also implemented the FIAT exchange ratio option in the send screen. Now you can choose your preferred currency in the settings page. Lastly, we’ve implemented a QR code scanner for ease of use when signing in using the QR code representation of the users’ passphrase. This will be used to scan QR codes from the Lisk Hub and a Lisk paper wallet.Lisk Explorer2.1.8 was released on Mainnet. This release integrates usage of statistics and a heatmap.2.2.0 is currently in the development phase. It will include a few usability changes and a slightly updated design. Recently found bugs, some of them submitted by the community are going to be resolved. It will include many improvements such as pagination, filtering, account view, and better support for multi-signature accounts.Thanks for keeping up with the latest developments here at Lightcurve. We look forward to sharing with you what the next two weeks will bring mid-December.The Lisk TeamDevelopment Update — November 29, 2018 was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 11. 29

Development Update — Novemb...

Development Update — November 29, 2018Hi Liskers,As usual, it’s been a busy couple of weeks for Lightcurve Development teams. Aside from the unveiling of our Development Roadmap and the opening of the Lisk Improvement Proposal process, development work has continued uninterrupted. We have released Lisk Core 1.3.0, Elements 1.1.3, Mobile 0.6.0 and Explorer 2.1.8. Check out the full rundown below.Lisk Core1.3.0 was released to Mainnet as planned on November 19. 1.3.0 gives node operators the option to use New Relic as a service to monitor node performance. This will be useful for all network stakeholders — delegates, exchanges as well as Lightcurve’s development teams. We have created a dedicated repository for this integration, which will provide you with all the information you need to start experimenting with Lisk Core and New Relic (use of New Relic is strictly optional, of course).1.4.0’s development phase ends soon, with only two issues left to review before it moves to the QA phase. As 1.4.0 already fixes several bugs and contains many improvements, we decided not to include any objectives from the new roadmap. Instead, these objectives will be included in releases following 1.4.0. The documentation of 1.4.0 will also have to be updated, as the whole ‘lisk-build’ repository is now consolidated into ‘lisk’. You can expect a PR in the ‘lisk-docs’ repository soon. In the meantime, work on the objectives stated by the roadmap has already begun — keep an eye and track the progress of ‘Introduce new flexible, resilient and modular architecture’ together with a great Database Layer refactor by checking out the following milestone.Lisk Improvement Proposals will help to enrich our network’s development into a diverse and robust blockchain application platform. We will report on their implementation on GitHub and in DevUpdates with each LIP having corresponding milestones. The ‘Projects’ section of our GitHub will reflect the content of releases and consist of issues being part of backlog and milestones. Please read carefully how we intend to notify the community about breaking changes in this dedicated LIP.We’ve opened two new milestones, which are the implementation equivalents of LIPs. These are named “Consistent and informative versioning scheme” and “Introduce new flexible, resilient and modular architecture — Phase 1” (also described as ‘Application Architecture’ here). Application Architecture will consist of three phases in total, each of them contained in a separate milestone. The next Lisk Core release, 1.5.0, will contain the first phase of Application Architecture and pressing issues from the backlog.Several issues opened by community members discussing the protocol changes to Lisk Core had been closed. We highly encourage the community to provide the review following the LIPs processes as described in the guidelines and keep the separation between the Lisk Core implementation discussed on the repository.Lisk Commander2.1.0 is currently in development. It will include features such as being able to get information from the transaction pool, as well as enabling data field when creating transfer transactions. 2.1.0 will also introduce commands to get voters and vote information from the blockchain, as well as more flexibility to fetch transactions from the blockchain.Lisk Elements1.1.3 was released as a patch in order to fix an issue dealing with a runtime problem in the non-babel environment. Please make sure you are using this version in development.2.0.0 is currently in development and will be released as a release candidate next week. It will include a more detailed error message for API errors, an upgrade to Node 8.10, stricter validation when creating transactions, as well as support for sodium-native. It also will include our optional migration to TypeScript migration — read more about this here.2.1.0 is also currently in development. It contains milestones from LIPs “Improve transaction processing efficiency” and “Introduce robust peer selection and banning mechanism”.Lisk Hub1.7.0 is currently in development. Its features will include implementing a bright background design, giving it more of a desktop look. 1.7.0 will also add a feedback link to the sidebar, which opens up more opportunities for community feedback about our network dashboard’s development. This particular version has also seen a finalized unit test migration to Jest, as well removing of Mocha and Karma. Tests are now 2–3 times faster and easier to debug.Lisk Mobile0.6.0 was released and includes a variety of new features. These include a new design of the send screen, which breaks the interface into several pages and introduces bookmarked accounts. We’ve also implemented the FIAT exchange ratio option in the send screen. Now you can choose your preferred currency in the settings page. Lastly, we’ve implemented a QR code scanner for ease of use when signing in using the QR code representation of the users’ passphrase. This will be used to scan QR codes from the Lisk Hub and a Lisk paper wallet.Lisk Explorer2.1.8 was released on Mainnet. This release integrates usage of statistics and a heatmap.2.2.0 is currently in the development phase. It will include a few usability changes and a slightly updated design. Recently found bugs, some of them submitted by the community are going to be resolved. It will include many improvements such as pagination, filtering, account view, and better support for multi-signature accounts.Thanks for keeping up with the latest developments here at Lightcurve. We look forward to sharing with you what the next two weeks will bring mid-December.The Lisk TeamDevelopment Update — November 29, 2018 was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 11. 29

Introducing the Lisk Improv...

Hello Liskers,Along with the unveiling of the brand new Lisk Development Roadmap , we are pleased to announce the beginning of the Lisk Improvement Proposal process. Lisk Improvement Proposals, also known as LIPs, form a proposal system which allows transparent and open discussion on how we develop the Lisk network and all the objectives disclosed on the new roadmap. The LIPs themselves are thoroughly researched technical documents which are designed to be robustly debated. LIPs follow in the tradition of blockchain improvement proposal systems pioneered by the Bitcoin Improvement Proposals in 2011.To put it simply, the objectives disclosed on the new roadmap provide a clear indication of Lisk’s direction, while LIPs provide the scientific backbone to this direction.Lightcurve Science and Development teams have been trialing and refining the LIP process internally throughout this year. Today we are excited to reveal both the process and initial body of research produced during this timeframe. As the number of LIPs grows, we will continue to add to this, so please star and follow this repository to stay updated and involved.We look forward to working together with the community in an open-source, collaborative manner using LIPs.https://medium.com/media/b99767ce49cdbb924d8792f50fa3ea0e/hrefProcess OverviewLet’s have a look at how LIPs are actually submitted. Please note that the process described below is intended as a general overview. Community members that would like to submit a guideline-compliant and technologically feasible LIP, please make sure to first read the full rules outlined in LIP-0001. You can also find the terminology used below in our dedicated LIP FAQ.LIP IdeationThe first step in submitting a LIP is to check that the idea is feasible. Much of this early research and discussion will be conducted on our mailing list.LIP ResearchAfter checking the feasibility of the initial idea, the next step is for the LIP champion to present the idea as a draft, by creating a new thread on the mailing list.Proposal Drafted on GitHubAfter the discussion on our mailing list, the LIP champion can create a pull request on GitHub. The LIP editor, who is a member of the Lisk Foundation, will then review the proposal, check that it adheres to the guidelines and assign a number. It is important to note that the LIP Editor does not evaluate a LIP on its content, but purely on formatting and guideline compliance.There are eight LIPs (plus the guidelines) already merged into our GitHub repo, with the status of a “draft”. These LIPs have been published already as the research conducted by Lightcurve has been deemed complete by the Lisk Foundation. They can be used by the community as a guideline to demonstrate the style and manner in which LIPs should be written and to push forward initial development on our roadmap.Once the LIP is published as a draft on GitHub, community members can continue to discuss the proposal on its mailing list thread.Alpha Implementation of a LIPFollowing both the discussion on the mailing list, and reviewing the proposal on GitHub, the Lisk Foundation will carefully deliberate, considering community popularity and traction, and the feasibility of the proposal. After taking these factors into account, the Lisk Foundation can instruct Lightcurve to begin development of an alpha reference implementation (proof of concept). Lightcurve will also conduct QA on alphanet of this implementation.Beta Implementation of a LIPNext, the Lisk Foundation can instruct Lightcurve to build the beta reference implementation, this again will be tested by Lightcurve on betanet (for major releases) and with the help of the community on the Testnet (all releases).Once work on the Beta implementation begins, the status of the LIP will be changed to “proposed”.Production BuildAfter testing on Betanet and QA, Lightcurve will prepare the release for the Mainnet. Once this release has been accepted by the majority of the nodes on the network, we can consider the proposal to have achieved full consensus, and the LIP’s status is changed to “active”.Please note that the LIP process is not fixed in stone, as we expect it to gradually evolve over time. The community can also propose changes to it by submitting a LIP with their suggested improvements.This system takes us one step further on our journey to achieve the decentralized and open-source blockchain ecosystem we envisioned, one in which will reap the benefits of collaboration and constructive feedback of the wider Lisk developer community.Lisk Improvement Proposals will help to enrich our network’s development into a diverse and robust blockchain application platform. Let’s build the future together!The Lisk TeamDisclaimer: The statements made herein and via other means of communication in relation to the Lisk roadmap are not guarantees but express current intention and describe potential. Use of the information available in this document or otherwise related to the Lisk roadmap as well as any use of the Lisk products is subject to the terms of use of the Lisk website including the Lisk privacy policy as well as all applicable laws. The information contained herein is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as investment, financial, or other advice.Introducing the Lisk Improvement Proposal Process was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 11. 22

Introducing the Lisk Improv...

Hello Liskers,Along with the unveiling of the brand new Lisk Development Roadmap , we are pleased to announce the beginning of the Lisk Improvement Proposal process. Lisk Improvement Proposals, also known as LIPs, form a proposal system which allows transparent and open discussion on how we develop the Lisk network and all the objectives disclosed on the new roadmap. The LIPs themselves are thoroughly researched technical documents which are designed to be robustly debated. LIPs follow in the tradition of blockchain improvement proposal systems pioneered by the Bitcoin Improvement Proposals in 2011.To put it simply, the objectives disclosed on the new roadmap provide a clear indication of Lisk’s direction, while LIPs provide the scientific backbone to this direction.Lightcurve Science and Development teams have been trialing and refining the LIP process internally throughout this year. Today we are excited to reveal both the process and initial body of research produced during this timeframe. As the number of LIPs grows, we will continue to add to this, so please star and follow this repository to stay updated and involved.We look forward to working together with the community in an open-source, collaborative manner using LIPs.https://medium.com/media/b99767ce49cdbb924d8792f50fa3ea0e/hrefProcess OverviewLet’s have a look at how LIPs are actually submitted. Please note that the process described below is intended as a general overview. Community members that would like to submit a guideline-compliant and technologically feasible LIP, please make sure to first read the full rules outlined in LIP-0001. You can also find the terminology used below in our dedicated LIP FAQ.LIP IdeationThe first step in submitting a LIP is to check that the idea is feasible. Much of this early research and discussion will be conducted on our mailing list.LIP ResearchAfter checking the feasibility of the initial idea, the next step is for the LIP champion to present the idea as a draft, by creating a new thread on the mailing list.Proposal Drafted on GitHubAfter the discussion on our mailing list, the LIP champion can create a pull request on GitHub. The LIP editor, who is a member of the Lisk Foundation, will then review the proposal, check that it adheres to the guidelines and assign a number. It is important to note that the LIP Editor does not evaluate a LIP on its content, but purely on formatting and guideline compliance.There are eight LIPs (plus the guidelines) already merged into our GitHub repo, with the status of a “draft”. These LIPs have been published already as the research conducted by Lightcurve has been deemed complete by the Lisk Foundation. They can be used by the community as a guideline to demonstrate the style and manner in which LIPs should be written and to push forward initial development on our roadmap.Once the LIP is published as a draft on GitHub, community members can continue to discuss the proposal on its mailing list thread.Alpha Implementation of a LIPFollowing both the discussion on the mailing list, and reviewing the proposal on GitHub, the Lisk Foundation will carefully deliberate, considering community popularity and traction, and the feasibility of the proposal. After taking these factors into account, the Lisk Foundation can instruct Lightcurve to begin development of an alpha reference implementation (proof of concept). Lightcurve will also conduct QA on alphanet of this implementation.Beta Implementation of a LIPNext, the Lisk Foundation can instruct Lightcurve to build the beta reference implementation, this again will be tested by Lightcurve on betanet (for major releases) and with the help of the community on the Testnet (all releases).Once work on the Beta implementation begins, the status of the LIP will be changed to “proposed”.Production BuildAfter testing on Betanet and QA, Lightcurve will prepare the release for the Mainnet. Once this release has been accepted by the majority of the nodes on the network, we can consider the proposal to have achieved full consensus, and the LIP’s status is changed to “active”.Please note that the LIP process is not fixed in stone, as we expect it to gradually evolve over time. The community can also propose changes to it by submitting a LIP with their suggested improvements.This system takes us one step further on our journey to achieve the decentralized and open-source blockchain ecosystem we envisioned, one in which will reap the benefits of collaboration and constructive feedback of the wider Lisk developer community.Lisk Improvement Proposals will help to enrich our network’s development into a diverse and robust blockchain application platform. Let’s build the future together!The Lisk TeamDisclaimer: The statements made herein and via other means of communication in relation to the Lisk roadmap are not guarantees but express current intention and describe potential. Use of the information available in this document or otherwise related to the Lisk roadmap as well as any use of the Lisk products is subject to the terms of use of the Lisk website including the Lisk privacy policy as well as all applicable laws. The information contained herein is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as investment, financial, or other advice.Introducing the Lisk Improvement Proposal Process was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 11. 22

Everything You Need To Know...

Hello Liskers,Access the Power of Blockchain. For Lisk, these words were always more than a slogan. Since the very beginning, it was our mission to close the gap between future users and the disruptive technology of blockchain. Through an ever-evolving Lisk Foundation and partners like Lightcurve, we’ve begun to spread our promise of bringing accessibility to the world of blockchain through Lisk’s own network, user interfaces, and education. The question has always remained on our community’s minds, however — what about achieving the ultimate goal of blockchain accessibility? How will we get to the final product of a fully functioning Sidechain Development Kit (SDK), as well as the interoperable, trustless and open-source platform for building blockchain applications?Past attempts at formulating a clear roadmap taking us to the future Lisk ecosystem failed to encapsulate the complexity of building something so cutting-edge and future-proof. Accidents in the industry showed us what can happen when networks are designed carelessly. It became clear that the roadmap needs to be based on in-depth scientific research, combined with tested workflows and hiring strategies. We have also realized that the most successful and robust of blockchain networks will be built in a truly decentralized and open-source way — opening up each step of the journey to community’s feedback and contribution. Today, we are extremely pleased to announce the final result of this mature approach to blockchain platform building, with the release of our comprehensive Lisk Development Roadmap and the announcement of the Lisk Improvement Proposal process, detailed in a separate blog post.The Design of Lisk’s RoadmapWe are focusing on providing the whole package of a functioning ecosystem, combining progressive and innovative protocol change with tried and tested open source initiatives. The envisioned Lisk blockchain application platform is being designed to make development easy and accessible to the widest body of developers. Our flexible, resilient and modular architecture will be one of the key traits developers will find most appealing when compared to our competition. The TypeScript migration and design patterns will streamline building and supporting blockchain applications. Prioritizing the SDK over sidechains means that we can start fostering the blockchain application ecosystem whilst implementing sidechain interoperability.https://medium.com/media/0a20c1e3acb3d2ed44b058ce500cacc9/hrefThe structure of the roadmap reflects a more agile approach to our development workflow. This allows us to reach the final product as fast as possible, while also taking into consideration any external challenges or LIP iterations that we may face along the way. Additionally, this roadmap has been constructed with the objective of providing the most attractive blockchain application platform for developers to build on. We are creating the optimal recipe for an SDK that is based on a solid foundation of clean architecture and design principles, upon which Lisk applications are best positioned to adapt to an ever-changing environment.Before we deep-dive into the specifics of the roadmap, let’s clarify some of the terminology used in the process.Roadmap PhasesSo far we’ve completed the Inception phase of the Roadmap. This included reaching important objectives such as a new API and P2P module included in the release of Lisk Core 1.0. In order to get to the end goal in the most efficient and streamlined way, we have divided the remaining part of the roadmap into eight distinct phases. Each phase displays key milestones within Lisk’s development, generally focused on particular objectives and the corresponding LIPs.Quality & PerformanceThis phase will improve API and vote verification performance. It will boost developer experience by allowing multiple networks per build and moving Lisk Build to Lisk Core. It will also refine the configuration migration system for future releases and developer tooling by adding New Relic based node benchmarking. Lastly, we will expand upon the overall developer experience by migrating Lisk Elements to TypeScript (described further below), creating a mono-repo structure in Lisk Elements and moving Lisk Build to Lisk Core. This stage is already underway with multiple objectives already accomplished and LIP debate opened.Architecture & DesignBlockchains by nature are rigid and immutable, This makes it more difficult to bring about change to an existing protocol and implementation. Therefore, it is very important that “technical debt” is minimized while the application platform is in the current stage. This phase implements a new modular and resilient architecture for Lisk Core, bringing multi-process support and elegant handling of protocol change. After this phase, Lisk Core will be architecturally stable enabling developers to use the Alpha SDK. This means that the architecture used to create new applications will be finalized, allowing developers to start development of proof-of-concept applications that will align with the future SDK. The ability to conduct rapid application development via our SDK will only have preliminary support at this stage.Security & ReliabilityThis phase brings a guarantee that blocks are finalized after 150 confirmations. We will also focus on mitigating transaction replays on different chains, and adding a robust peer selection and banning mechanism to the P2P module. Lisk Elements will add the ‘fee estimation’ component that will be used as part of the dynamic fee system.Network EconomicsHere, we will focus on integrating dynamic fees in Lisk Core in order to increase activity within the network in preparation for the future ecosystem. We will also add the ‘chain’ component to Lisk Elements.Network LongevityThe Network Longevity phase will ensure the network continues to support the Lisk blockchain application platform beyond the final stages shown on the roadmap.To achieve this, we will replace the address and block/transaction ID systems to secure immutability of the blockchain. We will also implement the ability for the Lisk Network to handle change elegantly in preparation for the more significant changes to the network.Delegated-Proof-of-StakeAs the name implies, this phase will bring improvements to our consensus mechanism, as well as add the application bootstrap component to Lisk Elements. Upon its completion, developers will have access to our Beta SDK. Our proposed custom token system, ICO mechanism, and sidechain interoperability solution will not be supported at this stage.ICOs & Custom TokensBy the beginning of this phase, a variety of important objectives will have been completed. These include the provision of improved blockchain security, dynamic fees, a new ID system, an evolved DPoS, the complete migration of Core and Elements to TypeScript, and the ability to conduct rapid application development via our SDK. During this phase we will add functionality to conduct ICOs on the Lisk mainchain, a sidechain element to Lisk Elements, which on completion delivers our Release Candidate SDK. Developers will be able to build their proof-of-concept blockchain applications with the full support of Lisk Elements and Lisk Commander. They will also be able to fully bootstrap and develop new applications using our SDK, which will include registering & transferring custom tokens and conducting ICOs for applications on the Lisk mainchain. Our proposed sidechain interoperability solution will not yet be supported at this stage.Blockchain Application PlatformMarking the final stage of our development roadmap, this phase will add sidechain communication between Lisk Core and application chains. The Blockchain Application Platform will be delivered in full, along with the Production SDK. At this point, developers will have access to a fully functioning SDK with scalable interoperability between sidechains and the mainchain, as well as trust-less token transfers.Major Changes Coming to the Lisk NetworkSo far, we’ve discussed the clear path of objectives and phases leading us to our end goal of a fully functioning blockchain application platform and the opening of the Lisk Improvement Process. What major changes are going to be implemented during the course of our Development Roadmap?New Application ArchitectureAs we previously mentioned, along with the rollout of the Alpha SDK we will finalize our new application architecture. The architecture will create the elasticity for applications to be easily extended with new behaviour and scaled to utilize all available physical resources. The new design will allow applications to scale from a single thread, multiple processes, to even distributed processes, as well as enabling easy modification and extension of existing applications through the use of a plugin pattern and a supporting API. As all other objectives on the Lisk development roadmap, this process is subject to alteration and improvement during the LIP process — please refer to the Lightcurve-championed LIP and the community discussion that follows. Lastly, the initial topics of Quality & Performance, as well as Architecture & Design, are intended to minimize the amount of “technical debt” imposed on Lisk’s core application and its proposed ecosystem of blockchain applications.For a full overview of the phases and their individual objectives, please refer to the Lisk website.Migration to TypeScriptAfter the completion of the Beta SDK, we will have migrated both Lisk Core and Lisk Elements to TypeScript. Before we outline some of the main benefits of additionally implementing TypeScript, let’s have a deeper look at what exactly is this programming language. Technically, this programming language is a superset of JavaScript, meaning it can do everything that JavaScript does, plus some additional functionality. It’s an open source language which first appeared in 2012, and has been gaining popularity ever since. In 2017, it was voted third most loved language in StackOverflow’s 2017 survey and was chosen by Google to build Angular 2.0. The annual State of JavaScript surveys also show the gradual rise of both popularity and usage of this programming language among JavaScript developers. In 2018, over 45% of those surveyed have claimed that they have and would use it again, a rise from 33% just a year ago. Similarly, an additional 33% in 2018 claimed that they have heard of TypeScript and would like to learn more. TypeScript brings many additions to JavaScript, including type checking, interfaces, abstract classes, algebraic data types, code refactoring, auto-completion, async functions, and decorators.JavaScript by itself does not enforce type checking. This means that when writing JavaScript, we do not have to consider types too much. For example, we can declare a variable, without even stating what type we intend it to be. Later on, we can switch it freely to any other type. We can also create a variable and assign it to a string, which can later be re-assigned to a number or boolean. This can be problematic, creating a level of unpredictability in terms of how an application will behave to varying types of input. If developers do not maintain a constant awareness of possible scenarios while writing code, this can lead to a type error occurring at runtime. Such failures should never occur when running mission-critical applications.TypeScript allows Lisk to take advantage of all the benefits of JavaScript, for example, its use on both client and server, its vibrant open-source community, and popularity, in combination with the benefits of the predictability of a statically typed language. This programming language also provides a great development experience, especially within modern development environments. When coding TypeScript in such an environment, type checking will occur when the code is transpiled, for example when you save, rather than when the application is run. This constant feedback, allows developers to pick up on type errors earlier and deal with them immediately, removing any chance of a type error occurring at runtime. Lisk Elements is therefore a good candidate for TypeScript, by helping us with our mission to build an accessible and secure blockchain application platform. Having said that, we recognize that TypeScript might not be the preference of all developers, so you will also be able to develop on Lisk using regular JavaScript. TypeScript transpiles to JavaScript, meaning that when you run Lisk Elements on a server or a browser, it is JavaScript that is being compiled to machine code. During the Network Economics phase of our roadmap, and after all modules have been extracted and migrated to Lisk Elements, we will also migrate the remaining Lisk Core application to TypeScript.Lisk ProtocolThroughout the roadmap, there is a gradual process of logic extraction and migration to Lisk Elements. In the first two phases, we are focusing on resolving the quality, performance, architecture and design aspects of Lisk, which at this point in the roadmap all affect Lisk Core. Following these phases, the roadmap is focused on bringing about the required protocol changes, based on the new application architecture.Prioritization of PhasesOur ultimate goal is to deliver a world-leading blockchain application platform as quickly as possible. In order to do so, issues like scalability, security and architecture need to be prioritized.We recognize the importance of both improving the DPoS, as well as introducing dynamic fees, as it will play a vital role in establishing Lisk as a healthy and active ecosystem for developers to join. That is why dynamic fees are scheduled to come directly after we address protocol and SDK objectives outlined in the roadmap. We are also implementing some improvements related to DPoS in the earlier phases of the roadmap. For example, we aim to improve block verification and finality in the Security & Reliability phase, and we intend to provide a future-proof protocol change mechanism in the Network Longevity phase. Both of the aforementioned phases set the stage for the DPoS improvements. We also recognize that how our DPoS mechanism will be changed is going to be a widely contested issue. Therefore we want to encourage a more robust debate on the subject in our LIPs mailing list and gather as much community input as possible. If we do not actively engage developers, there will be no viable Lisk ecosystem. Therefore we need to ensure developers are able to develop on our platform as soon as possible. This is also the reason why we have prioritised the SDK implementation over sidechains.The Road to the Lisk EcosystemSo far, we’ve outlined the structure of the roadmap phases and its priorities, as well as key changes to the network and protocol. But how are we going to get to the end goal of a blockchain application platform? Each phase represented on the roadmap is to be internally broken down into a strict release schedule, where changes are brought about to our alphanet, betanet and testnet in smaller and easy to manage releases. We have recently changed the way in which we manage the team workload — our developers are now able to migrate between projects on demand. We can shift our human resources to where we need it the most, broadening the technological knowledge and awareness within the entire team, keeping our developers constantly engaged. This results-driven approach is supported by the fact that all of the research work has been done before implementation, integration and QA. Therefore our developers have a clear direction on how something needs to be implemented in order to meet an objective. Releasing LIPs championed by Lightcurve and opening up community debate means that each objective’s research will be completed early on and support the development cycle in a streamlined manner.How Definite Is the Roadmap?The naming of objectives refers to the broader idea of changes to be implemented which can be changed depending on the outcome of their individual LIP process. We view our roadmap as a “living” document, one that can, and should adapt according to the changing environment in which the blockchain industry exists. The roadmap is definite in the sense of the ordering of the objectives, phases, and intent towards building a fully functioning blockchain application platform. Of course, when we achieve major objectives such as our Production SDK, sidechain interoperability and more, we will begin planning on implementing additional features to further improve and stimulate activity on the Lisk network. Each objective will have an associated thread for discussion on our official LIPs mailing list. A brief abstract and motivation for the proposed objective will be given to seed ideas for community proposals. After the unveiling of the roadmap, the LIP process is officially opened — the community is then invited to submit their own proposals on the objectives they feel strongest about. After the research has been completed for an objective, we will publish its first draft proposal — the community will then have the opportunity to contribute to finalizing the proposal.For all outstanding questions please refer to our Roadmap FAQ or contact our community managers on Lisk Chat.Our new roadmap, along with the introduction of the Lisk Improvement Proposal process, ushers in a new era of true open-source collaboration for the Lisk ecosystem. This community-driven approach to building the future ecosystem will put Lisk at the forefront of blockchain application platforms. Along with our dedicated community, we look forward to continue driving innovation and adoption.The Lisk TeamDisclaimer: The statements made herein and via other means of communication in relation to the Lisk roadmap are not guarantees but express current intention and describe potential. Use of the information available in this document or otherwise related to the Lisk roadmap as well as any use of the Lisk products is subject to the terms of use of the Lisk website including the Lisk privacy policy as well as all applicable laws. The information contained herein is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as investment, financial, or other advice.Everything You Need To Know About Lisk’s New Development Roadmap was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 11. 22

Everything You Need To Know...

Hello Liskers,Access the Power of Blockchain. For Lisk, these words were always more than a slogan. Since the very beginning, it was our mission to close the gap between future users and the disruptive technology of blockchain. Through an ever-evolving Lisk Foundation and partners like Lightcurve, we’ve begun to spread our promise of bringing accessibility to the world of blockchain through Lisk’s own network, user interfaces, and education. The question has always remained on our community’s minds, however — what about achieving the ultimate goal of blockchain accessibility? How will we get to the final product of a fully functioning Sidechain Development Kit (SDK), as well as the interoperable, trustless and open-source platform for building blockchain applications?Past attempts at formulating a clear roadmap taking us to the future Lisk ecosystem failed to encapsulate the complexity of building something so cutting-edge and future-proof. Accidents in the industry showed us what can happen when networks are designed carelessly. It became clear that the roadmap needs to be based on in-depth scientific research, combined with tested workflows and hiring strategies. We have also realized that the most successful and robust of blockchain networks will be built in a truly decentralized and open-source way — opening up each step of the journey to community’s feedback and contribution. Today, we are extremely pleased to announce the final result of this mature approach to blockchain platform building, with the release of our comprehensive Lisk Development Roadmap and the announcement of the Lisk Improvement Proposal process, detailed in a separate blog post.The Design of Lisk’s RoadmapWe are focusing on providing the whole package of a functioning ecosystem, combining progressive and innovative protocol change with tried and tested open source initiatives. The envisioned Lisk blockchain application platform is being designed to make development easy and accessible to the widest body of developers. Our flexible, resilient and modular architecture will be one of the key traits developers will find most appealing when compared to our competition. The TypeScript migration and design patterns will streamline building and supporting blockchain applications. Prioritizing the SDK over sidechains means that we can start fostering the blockchain application ecosystem whilst implementing sidechain interoperability.https://medium.com/media/0a20c1e3acb3d2ed44b058ce500cacc9/hrefThe structure of the roadmap reflects a more agile approach to our development workflow. This allows us to reach the final product as fast as possible, while also taking into consideration any external challenges or LIP iterations that we may face along the way. Additionally, this roadmap has been constructed with the objective of providing the most attractive blockchain application platform for developers to build on. We are creating the optimal recipe for an SDK that is based on a solid foundation of clean architecture and design principles, upon which Lisk applications are best positioned to adapt to an ever-changing environment.Before we deep-dive into the specifics of the roadmap, let’s clarify some of the terminology used in the process.Roadmap PhasesSo far we’ve completed the Inception phase of the Roadmap. This included reaching important objectives such as a new API and P2P module included in the release of Lisk Core 1.0. In order to get to the end goal in the most efficient and streamlined way, we have divided the remaining part of the roadmap into eight distinct phases. Each phase displays key milestones within Lisk’s development, generally focused on particular objectives and the corresponding LIPs.Quality & PerformanceThis phase will improve API and vote verification performance. It will boost developer experience by allowing multiple networks per build and moving Lisk Build to Lisk Core. It will also refine the configuration migration system for future releases and developer tooling by adding New Relic based node benchmarking. Lastly, we will expand upon the overall developer experience by migrating Lisk Elements to TypeScript (described further below), creating a mono-repo structure in Lisk Elements and moving Lisk Build to Lisk Core. This stage is already underway with multiple objectives already accomplished and LIP debate opened.Architecture & DesignBlockchains by nature are rigid and immutable, This makes it more difficult to bring about change to an existing protocol and implementation. Therefore, it is very important that “technical debt” is minimized while the application platform is in the current stage. This phase implements a new modular and resilient architecture for Lisk Core, bringing multi-process support and elegant handling of protocol change. After this phase, Lisk Core will be architecturally stable enabling developers to use the Alpha SDK. This means that the architecture used to create new applications will be finalized, allowing developers to start development of proof-of-concept applications that will align with the future SDK. The ability to conduct rapid application development via our SDK will only have preliminary support at this stage.Security & ReliabilityThis phase brings a guarantee that blocks are finalized after 150 confirmations. We will also focus on mitigating transaction replays on different chains, and adding a robust peer selection and banning mechanism to the P2P module. Lisk Elements will add the ‘fee estimation’ component that will be used as part of the dynamic fee system.Network EconomicsHere, we will focus on integrating dynamic fees in Lisk Core in order to increase activity within the network in preparation for the future ecosystem. We will also add the ‘chain’ component to Lisk Elements.Network LongevityThe Network Longevity phase will ensure the network continues to support the Lisk blockchain application platform beyond the final stages shown on the roadmap.To achieve this, we will replace the address and block/transaction ID systems to secure immutability of the blockchain. We will also implement the ability for the Lisk Network to handle change elegantly in preparation for the more significant changes to the network.Delegated-Proof-of-StakeAs the name implies, this phase will bring improvements to our consensus mechanism, as well as add the application bootstrap component to Lisk Elements. Upon its completion, developers will have access to our Beta SDK. Our proposed custom token system, ICO mechanism, and sidechain interoperability solution will not be supported at this stage.ICOs & Custom TokensBy the beginning of this phase, a variety of important objectives will have been completed. These include the provision of improved blockchain security, dynamic fees, a new ID system, an evolved DPoS, the complete migration of Core and Elements to TypeScript, and the ability to conduct rapid application development via our SDK. During this phase we will add functionality to conduct ICOs on the Lisk mainchain, a sidechain element to Lisk Elements, which on completion delivers our Release Candidate SDK. Developers will be able to build their proof-of-concept blockchain applications with the full support of Lisk Elements and Lisk Commander. They will also be able to fully bootstrap and develop new applications using our SDK, which will include registering & transferring custom tokens and conducting ICOs for applications on the Lisk mainchain. Our proposed sidechain interoperability solution will not yet be supported at this stage.Blockchain Application PlatformMarking the final stage of our development roadmap, this phase will add sidechain communication between Lisk Core and application chains. The Blockchain Application Platform will be delivered in full, along with the Production SDK. At this point, developers will have access to a fully functioning SDK with scalable interoperability between sidechains and the mainchain, as well as trust-less token transfers.Major Changes Coming to the Lisk NetworkSo far, we’ve discussed the clear path of objectives and phases leading us to our end goal of a fully functioning blockchain application platform and the opening of the Lisk Improvement Process. What major changes are going to be implemented during the course of our Development Roadmap?New Application ArchitectureAs we previously mentioned, along with the rollout of the Alpha SDK we will finalize our new application architecture. The architecture will create the elasticity for applications to be easily extended with new behaviour and scaled to utilize all available physical resources. The new design will allow applications to scale from a single thread, multiple processes, to even distributed processes, as well as enabling easy modification and extension of existing applications through the use of a plugin pattern and a supporting API. As all other objectives on the Lisk development roadmap, this process is subject to alteration and improvement during the LIP process — please refer to the Lightcurve-championed LIP and the community discussion that follows. Lastly, the initial topics of Quality & Performance, as well as Architecture & Design, are intended to minimize the amount of “technical debt” imposed on Lisk’s core application and its proposed ecosystem of blockchain applications.For a full overview of the phases and their individual objectives, please refer to the Lisk website.Migration to TypeScriptAfter the completion of the Beta SDK, we will have migrated both Lisk Core and Lisk Elements to TypeScript. Before we outline some of the main benefits of additionally implementing TypeScript, let’s have a deeper look at what exactly is this programming language. Technically, this programming language is a superset of JavaScript, meaning it can do everything that JavaScript does, plus some additional functionality. It’s an open source language which first appeared in 2012, and has been gaining popularity ever since. In 2017, it was voted third most loved language in StackOverflow’s 2017 survey and was chosen by Google to build Angular 2.0. The annual State of JavaScript surveys also show the gradual rise of both popularity and usage of this programming language among JavaScript developers. In 2018, over 45% of those surveyed have claimed that they have and would use it again, a rise from 33% just a year ago. Similarly, an additional 33% in 2018 claimed that they have heard of TypeScript and would like to learn more. TypeScript brings many additions to JavaScript, including type checking, interfaces, abstract classes, algebraic data types, code refactoring, auto-completion, async functions, and decorators.JavaScript by itself does not enforce type checking. This means that when writing JavaScript, we do not have to consider types too much. For example, we can declare a variable, without even stating what type we intend it to be. Later on, we can switch it freely to any other type. We can also create a variable and assign it to a string, which can later be re-assigned to a number or boolean. This can be problematic, creating a level of unpredictability in terms of how an application will behave to varying types of input. If developers do not maintain a constant awareness of possible scenarios while writing code, this can lead to a type error occurring at runtime. Such failures should never occur when running mission-critical applications.TypeScript allows Lisk to take advantage of all the benefits of JavaScript, for example, its use on both client and server, its vibrant open-source community, and popularity, in combination with the benefits of the predictability of a statically typed language. This programming language also provides a great development experience, especially within modern development environments. When coding TypeScript in such an environment, type checking will occur when the code is transpiled, for example when you save, rather than when the application is run. This constant feedback, allows developers to pick up on type errors earlier and deal with them immediately, removing any chance of a type error occurring at runtime. Lisk Elements is therefore a good candidate for TypeScript, by helping us with our mission to build an accessible and secure blockchain application platform. Having said that, we recognize that TypeScript might not be the preference of all developers, so you will also be able to develop on Lisk using regular JavaScript. TypeScript transpiles to JavaScript, meaning that when you run Lisk Elements on a server or a browser, it is JavaScript that is being compiled to machine code. During the Network Economics phase of our roadmap, and after all modules have been extracted and migrated to Lisk Elements, we will also migrate the remaining Lisk Core application to TypeScript.Lisk ProtocolThroughout the roadmap, there is a gradual process of logic extraction and migration to Lisk Elements. In the first two phases, we are focusing on resolving the quality, performance, architecture and design aspects of Lisk, which at this point in the roadmap all affect Lisk Core. Following these phases, the roadmap is focused on bringing about the required protocol changes, based on the new application architecture.Prioritization of PhasesOur ultimate goal is to deliver a world-leading blockchain application platform as quickly as possible. In order to do so, issues like scalability, security and architecture need to be prioritized.We recognize the importance of both improving the DPoS, as well as introducing dynamic fees, as it will play a vital role in establishing Lisk as a healthy and active ecosystem for developers to join. That is why dynamic fees are scheduled to come directly after we address protocol and SDK objectives outlined in the roadmap. We are also implementing some improvements related to DPoS in the earlier phases of the roadmap. For example, we aim to improve block verification and finality in the Security & Reliability phase, and we intend to provide a future-proof protocol change mechanism in the Network Longevity phase. Both of the aforementioned phases set the stage for the DPoS improvements. We also recognize that how our DPoS mechanism will be changed is going to be a widely contested issue. Therefore we want to encourage a more robust debate on the subject in our LIPs mailing list and gather as much community input as possible. If we do not actively engage developers, there will be no viable Lisk ecosystem. Therefore we need to ensure developers are able to develop on our platform as soon as possible. This is also the reason why we have prioritised the SDK implementation over sidechains.The Road to the Lisk EcosystemSo far, we’ve outlined the structure of the roadmap phases and its priorities, as well as key changes to the network and protocol. But how are we going to get to the end goal of a blockchain application platform? Each phase represented on the roadmap is to be internally broken down into a strict release schedule, where changes are brought about to our alphanet, betanet and testnet in smaller and easy to manage releases. We have recently changed the way in which we manage the team workload — our developers are now able to migrate between projects on demand. We can shift our human resources to where we need it the most, broadening the technological knowledge and awareness within the entire team, keeping our developers constantly engaged. This results-driven approach is supported by the fact that all of the research work has been done before implementation, integration and QA. Therefore our developers have a clear direction on how something needs to be implemented in order to meet an objective. Releasing LIPs championed by Lightcurve and opening up community debate means that each objective’s research will be completed early on and support the development cycle in a streamlined manner.How Definite Is the Roadmap?The naming of objectives refers to the broader idea of changes to be implemented which can be changed depending on the outcome of their individual LIP process. We view our roadmap as a “living” document, one that can, and should adapt according to the changing environment in which the blockchain industry exists. The roadmap is definite in the sense of the ordering of the objectives, phases, and intent towards building a fully functioning blockchain application platform. Of course, when we achieve major objectives such as our Production SDK, sidechain interoperability and more, we will begin planning on implementing additional features to further improve and stimulate activity on the Lisk network. Each objective will have an associated thread for discussion on our official LIPs mailing list. A brief abstract and motivation for the proposed objective will be given to seed ideas for community proposals. After the unveiling of the roadmap, the LIP process is officially opened — the community is then invited to submit their own proposals on the objectives they feel strongest about. After the research has been completed for an objective, we will publish its first draft proposal — the community will then have the opportunity to contribute to finalizing the proposal.For all outstanding questions please refer to our Roadmap FAQ or contact our community managers on Lisk Chat.Our new roadmap, along with the introduction of the Lisk Improvement Proposal process, ushers in a new era of true open-source collaboration for the Lisk ecosystem. This community-driven approach to building the future ecosystem will put Lisk at the forefront of blockchain application platforms. Along with our dedicated community, we look forward to continue driving innovation and adoption.The Lisk TeamDisclaimer: The statements made herein and via other means of communication in relation to the Lisk roadmap are not guarantees but express current intention and describe potential. Use of the information available in this document or otherwise related to the Lisk roadmap as well as any use of the Lisk products is subject to the terms of use of the Lisk website including the Lisk privacy policy as well as all applicable laws. The information contained herein is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as investment, financial, or other advice.Everything You Need To Know About Lisk’s New Development Roadmap was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 11. 22

Development Update — Novemb...

Development Update — November 15, 2018Hi Liskers,As usual, it’s been a busy couple of weeks for Lightcurve Development teams. We have had a large number of releases, including Lisk Core 1.3.0-rc.0 to Testnet, Core 1.2.1, Commander 2.0.0, Elements 1.1.1, Hub 1.6.0, as well as Mobile 0.5.0. Check out the full rundown below.Lisk Core1.2.0 — This was released to Mainnet on Nov 8. For more details on 1.2.0’s features please refer to the previous Development Update.1.2.1 — This patch was a response to a submission to our new Bug Bounty Program. We were able to process the bug quickly and provide a solution the following day. The fix concerned an issue with signatures on multi-signature accounts, where a vulnerability made it possible to sign multi-signature transactions without the agreement of other participants. It is important to note that the issue was addressed quickly and a fix was delivered without any accounts being affected. We are pleased to see that the Bug Bounty is already bringing valuable contributions to Lisk’s security. Please be sure to upgrade your nodes with this important update.1.3.0 — We released the first Release Candidate for 1.3 to Testnet on Nov 14. 1.3 gives node operators the option to use New Relic as a service to monitor node performance. This will be useful for all network stakeholders — delegates, exchanges as well as Lightcurve’s development teams. We have created a dedicated repository for this integration, which will provide you with all the information you need to start experimenting with Lisk Core and New Relic (use of New Relic is strictly optional, of course). Provided that we do not identify any matters requiring further attention with 1.3.0 on Testnet, we plan to release it to Mainnet early next week.1.4.0 — Development of 1.4.0 is still ongoing, including several important bug-fixes and code refactors. As soon as Lisk Core 1.4 reaches Mainnet, Lisk Build will be archived. All of the build scripts necessary to convert Lisk Core into an installable package will reside in this directory.Lisk Elements and Commander2.0.0 (Commander) — This version brings with it framework changes (Vorpal to Oclif), improved validation of transaction inputs, an option to create multiple accounts, and an option to create a signature object for multi-signature accounts.1.1.1 (Elements) — This production version of Elements contains a change to the mono-repo structure, which allows us to put multiple packages in one repository. It also adds a validation function for transactions. From now on, we ask everyone who is using ‘lisk-elements’ for front-end development to start using either @liskhq/lisk-client or individual packages.Lisk Hub1.6.0 — This release adds the “set max amount” send feature, amongst other improvements. Download the latest version of Lisk Hub here.Lisk Mobile0.5.0 — This release of our smartphone wallet features a new welcome screen, amongst other changes. Download it on the App Store or Google Play.Thanks for keeping up with the latest developments here at Lightcurve. We look forward to sharing with you what the next two weeks will bring in early December.The Lisk TeamDevelopment Update — November 15, 2018 was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 11. 15

Development Update — Novemb...

Development Update — November 15, 2018Hi Liskers,As usual, it’s been a busy couple of weeks for Lightcurve Development teams. We have had a large number of releases, including Lisk Core 1.3.0-rc.0 to Testnet, Core 1.2.1, Commander 2.0.0, Elements 1.1.1, Hub 1.6.0, as well as Mobile 0.5.0. Check out the full rundown below.Lisk Core1.2.0 — This was released to Mainnet on Nov 8. For more details on 1.2.0’s features please refer to the previous Development Update.1.2.1 — This patch was a response to a submission to our new Bug Bounty Program. We were able to process the bug quickly and provide a solution the following day. The fix concerned an issue with signatures on multi-signature accounts, where a vulnerability made it possible to sign multi-signature transactions without the agreement of other participants. It is important to note that the issue was addressed quickly and a fix was delivered without any accounts being affected. We are pleased to see that the Bug Bounty is already bringing valuable contributions to Lisk’s security. Please be sure to upgrade your nodes with this important update.1.3.0 — We released the first Release Candidate for 1.3 to Testnet on Nov 14. 1.3 gives node operators the option to use New Relic as a service to monitor node performance. This will be useful for all network stakeholders — delegates, exchanges as well as Lightcurve’s development teams. We have created a dedicated repository for this integration, which will provide you with all the information you need to start experimenting with Lisk Core and New Relic (use of New Relic is strictly optional, of course). Provided that we do not identify any matters requiring further attention with 1.3.0 on Testnet, we plan to release it to Mainnet early next week.1.4.0 — Development of 1.4.0 is still ongoing, including several important bug-fixes and code refactors. As soon as Lisk Core 1.4 reaches Mainnet, Lisk Build will be archived. All of the build scripts necessary to convert Lisk Core into an installable package will reside in this directory.Lisk Elements and Commander2.0.0 (Commander) — This version brings with it framework changes (Vorpal to Oclif), improved validation of transaction inputs, an option to create multiple accounts, and an option to create a signature object for multi-signature accounts.1.1.1 (Elements) — This production version of Elements contains a change to the mono-repo structure, which allows us to put multiple packages in one repository. It also adds a validation function for transactions. From now on, we ask everyone who is using ‘lisk-elements’ for front-end development to start using either @liskhq/lisk-client or individual packages.Lisk Hub1.6.0 — This release adds the “set max amount” send feature, amongst other improvements. Download the latest version of Lisk Hub here.Lisk Mobile0.5.0 — This release of our smartphone wallet features a new welcome screen, amongst other changes. Download it on the App Store or Google Play.Thanks for keeping up with the latest developments here at Lightcurve. We look forward to sharing with you what the next two weeks will bring in early December.The Lisk TeamDevelopment Update — November 15, 2018 was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 11. 15

We Are Discontinuing Lisk N...

We Are Discontinuing Lisk Nano — Here’s WhyLisk Nano will be discontinued on November 14 at 12:00PM CET, as Lightcurve frontend teams focus on expanding Hub and Mobile. Nano’s code will be moved to an archived, public repository but will not be maintained by the Foundation or its contractors.Here at Lisk, we’re big believers in the part immersive user interfaces and experience will take in achieving global blockchain adoption. As with the boom of the Internet era, the general audience will be key in legitimising the technology through mainstream use. With this in mind, the Lisk Foundation has put great importance on creating industry-leading wallets and dashboards for all types of users to interact with our network and utility token, LSK. The first standalone product of the frontend branch of Lightcurve’s development was Lisk Nano. As previously announced, on November 14 12:00PM CET we will be discontinuing the support of Nano and focusing our efforts on the development of Lisk Hub and Mobile.Lisk NanoNano was first rolled out in August 2016. With five minor and two major releases in 2017 and 2018, 3552 commits from 20 contributors, 511 merged pull requests and 510 closed issues, it was the only official standalone wallet to manage LSK tokens or take part in our consensus algorithm for almost two years. We have announced the release of Lisk Hub at our February Relaunch event, which marked a new step in our journey to deliver user interfaces. During that period, we also disclosed our plans to eventually discontinue Nano and focus our work on new frontend products.Lisk HubFirst released in February 2018, Hub uses the logic for basic functionalities developed for Lisk Nano like transactions, voting for delegates and account creation, but expands on them in a variety of ways. The Hub is a collaborative effort of Lightcurve frontend development teams and specialist UX/UI contractors aimed at pushing its appeal beyond blockchain insiders and encouraging mainstream use. The design is slicker and has space for more features. Some already exist, for example exploring our blockchain, keeping up-to-date with the network’s updates, or following specific addresses. Hub’s design also allows us to easily implement more network features in the future, such as ICO registration and promotion. The amount of work that has already been put to Hub is incomparable to Nano. Even though it is less than a year old, Hub’s repository boasts over 7000 commits, 620 closed pull requests and 686 closed issues.Lisk MobileAnnounced at our Berlin Meetup on October 2018, Mobile retains basic functionalities of a wallet provided by Lisk Nano and extends them to smartphone users for a more casual, on-the-go experience. It already has such mobile user-friendly features such as biometric authentication, a QR code scanner, or passphrase backup.What’s next?So what exactly will happen to Nano? On November 14, we will remove it from our website and officially stop maintaining the code. As Lisk is fully open-source, Nano’s code will remain public for community to make use of for any third party applications they plan to develop. Please be aware that we do not officially endorse usage of Nano from that point and recommend downloading latest versions of Lisk Hub and Lisk Mobile. We look forward to keep delivering on our promise of creating industry-leading user interfaces.The Lisk TeamWe Are Discontinuing Lisk Nano — Here’s Why was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 11. 06

We Are Discontinuing Lisk N...

We Are Discontinuing Lisk Nano — Here’s WhyLisk Nano will be discontinued on November 14 at 12:00PM CET, as Lightcurve frontend teams focus on expanding Hub and Mobile. Nano’s code will be moved to an archived, public repository but will not be maintained by the Foundation or its contractors.Here at Lisk, we’re big believers in the part immersive user interfaces and experience will take in achieving global blockchain adoption. As with the boom of the Internet era, the general audience will be key in legitimising the technology through mainstream use. With this in mind, the Lisk Foundation has put great importance on creating industry-leading wallets and dashboards for all types of users to interact with our network and utility token, LSK. The first standalone product of the frontend branch of Lightcurve’s development was Lisk Nano. As previously announced, on November 14 12:00PM CET we will be discontinuing the support of Nano and focusing our efforts on the development of Lisk Hub and Mobile.Lisk NanoNano was first rolled out in August 2016. With five minor and two major releases in 2017 and 2018, 3552 commits from 20 contributors, 511 merged pull requests and 510 closed issues, it was the only official standalone wallet to manage LSK tokens or take part in our consensus algorithm for almost two years. We have announced the release of Lisk Hub at our February Relaunch event, which marked a new step in our journey to deliver user interfaces. During that period, we also disclosed our plans to eventually discontinue Nano and focus our work on new frontend products.Lisk HubFirst released in February 2018, Hub uses the logic for basic functionalities developed for Lisk Nano like transactions, voting for delegates and account creation, but expands on them in a variety of ways. The Hub is a collaborative effort of Lightcurve frontend development teams and specialist UX/UI contractors aimed at pushing its appeal beyond blockchain insiders and encouraging mainstream use. The design is slicker and has space for more features. Some already exist, for example exploring our blockchain, keeping up-to-date with the network’s updates, or following specific addresses. Hub’s design also allows us to easily implement more network features in the future, such as ICO registration and promotion. The amount of work that has already been put to Hub is incomparable to Nano. Even though it is less than a year old, Hub’s repository boasts over 7000 commits, 620 closed pull requests and 686 closed issues.Lisk MobileAnnounced at our Berlin Meetup on October 2018, Mobile retains basic functionalities of a wallet provided by Lisk Nano and extends them to smartphone users for a more casual, on-the-go experience. It already has such mobile user-friendly features such as biometric authentication, a QR code scanner, or passphrase backup.What’s next?So what exactly will happen to Nano? On November 14, we will remove it from our website and officially stop maintaining the code. As Lisk is fully open-source, Nano’s code will remain public for community to make use of for any third party applications they plan to develop. Please be aware that we do not officially endorse usage of Nano from that point and recommend downloading latest versions of Lisk Hub and Lisk Mobile. We look forward to keep delivering on our promise of creating industry-leading user interfaces.The Lisk TeamWe Are Discontinuing Lisk Nano — Here’s Why was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 11. 06

Development Update — Novemb...

Development Update — November 1, 2018Hi Liskers,As usual, it’s been a busy couple of weeks for Lightcurve Development teams. Among key achievements, we have the release of Lisk Core 1.1.1 to Mainnet, a new version of Hub 1.5.0 and Mobile 0.4.0. Check out the full rundown below.Lisk Core1.1.0 — With 1.1.0 released on Mainnet, node operators can now switch easily between networks without the need of rebuilding, as well as other improvements, such as an upgrade to Postgres 10, consistent usage of Bignumer.js. Full details of 1.1.0 are available in the previous blog.1.1.1 — This patch was released to Mainnet in response to a security vulnerability identified by community member, Simon Warta, as well as to network-facing problems due to issue #2490, which was caused by a failing validation schema.Simon disclosed two vulnerabilities related to the representation of Lisk addresses as strings. The first vulnerability was due to signatures being calculated from the first 8 bytes representing the address and the subsequent bytes being disregarded. The first identified vulnerability could make use of these overflow addresses by adding to them a long integer, resulting in a malformed address without the necessary matching private key. Only addresses 0L to 54L were affected by this first vulnerability, as all other addresses would result in a length greater than 21 characters, and therefore be rejected.The second vulnerability Simon identified refers to any address with a leading “0”. These zeros are skipped when it comes to generating transaction signatures, but are not being truncated while updating the balance in the database. This could also result in the transaction being sent to a malformed address, one in which it is impossible to generate a private-public keypair, resulting in LSK being inaccessible, or “burned”.Thanks to Simons’s disclosure, we were able to patch and release 1.1.1 within the next day. Throughout this period, the integrity of Lisk’s network was maintained and no transactions were maliciously burned during the patching process. The vast majority of node operators have upgraded to 1.1.1 within 24 hours. For those who haven’t updated their nodes on Testnet and Mainnet yet, please do so here.We are grateful for Simon’s hard work identifying the vulnerabilities mentioned above. Inspired by notable community contributions to our open-source culture like this one, we have decided to formalize our Bug Bounty Program. We look forward to continue working with the community to ensure the greatest level of security and robustness for the Lisk network.1.2.0 — This was released to Testnet on November 1. 1.2.0 includes an update to Node.js 8.12.0, support for new environment variables and use of DNS rather than IPs for seed nodes, amongst others. For more details refer to the previous dev update.1.3.0 — After the release of 1.2.0 to Testnet, the QA phase of 1.3.0 is due to start next week.1.4.0 — This version is currently in development. Work is underway on the new Fuzzy Search feature, which will allow users to search transactions by the transaction memo field. This will be of particular interest for community members who have built several tools and projects which utilise the transaction memo field. Implementing fuzzy search will allow for even greater creativity when working with this field.Lisk Elements and Commander2.0.0-beta.2 (Commander) — This release includes a bug fix for delegate registration and vote transactions.2.0.0 (Elements)— Work on migrating to TypeScript continues.Lisk Hub1.5.0 — The next version of the Hub was released on October 31. Users can now follow Lisk accounts, making it even easier to send Lisk transactions to known addresses. This is because users can follow and name commonly used addresses. No need to copy and paste, and double check when using followed accounts. Download the latest version of Hub to try out this cool new feature now.Lisk Mobile0.4.0 — This was released on October 25. With 0.4.0, users can now use biometric authentication (Face ID, Touch ID in IOS, and Fingerprint in Android) to log in to the app. We have also further improved the user experience by implementing pull-to-refresh functionality to the activity list, which makes it even easier to keep up-to-date with your latest LSK transactions. Full release notes can be found here.0.5.0 — Development on this version of Mobile continues. 0.5.0 will bring notifications and and an improved welcome screen to Lisk Mobile.Thanks for keeping up with the latest developments here at Lightcurve. We look forward to sharing with you what the next two weeks will bring in late November.The Lisk TeamDevelopment Update — November 1, 2018 was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 11. 01

Transaction History
Transaction History Market Market Transaction volume Address
CHAOEX LSK/BTC 952.62 476,303,796.76 Short cut
ABCC LSK/ETH 1,434.39 324,561,455.89 Short cut
CoinEgg LSK/BTC 950.45 295,757,358.28 Short cut
Coinall LSK/BTC 953.04 48,321,319.44 Short cut
Huobi Global LSK/BTC 808.41 17,216,424.74 Short cut
Exrates LSK/BTC 952.53 17,205,081.24 Short cut
UPbit LSK/KRW 941.00 14,818,207.79 Short cut
HitBTC LSK/USDT 809.85 8,520,009.07 Short cut
LiveCoin LSK/USD 826.83 8,050,176.05 Short cut
EXMO LSK/RUB 830.66 6,803,278.82 Short cut
Binance LSK/BNB 969.35 6,160,007.68 Short cut
Bittrex LSK/BTC 808.86 3,951,592.86 Short cut
Coindeal LSK/BTC 953.05 1,655,906.67 Short cut
Bitbns LSK/INR 1,291.04 436,448.61 Short cut
Kucoin LSK/ETH 971.42 86,468.96 Short cut
YObit LSK/USD 600.80 68,099.30 Short cut
Gate.io LSK/BTC 912.27 1,370.58 Short cut
Huobi Korea LSK/BTC 941.45 0.00 Short cut
COSS LSK/COS 717.36 0.00 Short cut
Bit-Z LSK/BTC 800.74 0.00 Short cut
OKEx LSK/ETH 962.68 0.00 Short cut
LiteBit.eu LSK/EUR 1,607.08 0.00 Short cut
Coinbe LSK/BTC 1,708.82 0.00 Short cut
BitBay LSK/USD 845.45 0.00 Short cut
Huobi (HBUS) LSK/ETH 950.18 0.00 Short cut
POLONIEX To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
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Hard cap -
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Market of major crypto coins *2019년 12월 09일 last update

Bitcoin

BTC

8,927,264.51 KRW 0.59%

Ethereum

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Ripple

XRP

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Tether

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Bitcoin Cash

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XMR

63,863.25 KRW 1.98%

Huobi Token

HT

3,348.99 KRW 0.29%

NEO

NEO

10,679.46 KRW 0.39%

Maker

MKR

594,536.30 KRW 0.51%

Dash

DASH

61,285.26 KRW 1.49%

USD Coin

USDC

1,191.43 KRW 0.39%

Ethereum Classic

ETC

4,653.57 KRW 0.21%